Safely narrow down the apparent chaos

There is that thing about me: I like understanding. I represent my internal process of understanding as the interplay of three imaginary entities: the curious ape, the happy bulldog, and the austere monk. The curious ape is the part of me who instinctively reaches for anything new and interesting. The curious ape does basic gauging of that new thing: ‘can kill or hopefully not always?’, ‘edible or unfortunately not without risk?’ etc. When it does not always kill and can be eaten, the happy bulldog is released from its leash. It takes pleasure in rummaging around things, sniffing and digging in the search of adjacent phenomena. Believe me, when my internal happy bulldog starts sniffing around and digging things out, they just pile up. Whenever I study a new topic, the folder I have assigned to it swells like a balloon, with articles, books, reports, websites etc. A moment comes when those piles of adjacent phenomena start needing some order and this is when my internal austere monk steps into the game. His basic tool is the Ockham’s razor, which cuts the obvious from the dubious, and thus, eventually, cuts bullshit off.

In my last update in French, namely in Le modèle d’un marché relativement conformiste, I returned to that business plan for the project EneFin, and the first thing my internal curious ape is gauging right now is the so-called absorption by the market. EneFin is supposed to be an innovative concept, and, as any innovation, it will need to kind of get into the market. It can do so as people in the market will opt for shifting from being just potential users to being the actual ones. In other words, the success of any business depends on a sequence of decisions taken by people who are supposed to be customers.

People are supposed to make decisions regarding my new products or technologies. Decisions have their patterns. I wrote more about this particular issue in an update on this blog, entitled ‘And so I ventured myself into the realm of what people think they can do’, for example. Now, I am interested in the more marketing-oriented, aggregate outcome of those decisions. The commonly used theoretical tool here is the normal distribution(see for example Robertson): we assume that, as customers switch to purchasing that new thing, the population of users grows as a cumulative normal fraction (i.e. fraction based on the normal distribution) of the general population.

As I said, I like understanding. What I want is to really understandthe logic behind simulating aggregate outcomes of customers’ decisions with the help of normal distribution. Right, then let’s do some understanding. Below, I am introducing two graphical presentations of the normal distribution: the first is the ‘official’ one, the second, further below, is my own, uncombed and freshly woken up interpretation.

The normal distribution

 

Normal distribution interpreted

 

So, the logic behind the equation starts biblically: in the beginning, there is chaos. Everyone can do anything. Said chaos occurs in a space, based on the constant e = 2,71828, known as the base of the natural logarithm and reputed to be really handy for studying dynamic processes. This space is ex. Any customer can take any decision in a space made by ‘e’ elevated to the power ‘x’, or the power of the moment. Yes, ‘x’ is a moment, i.e. the moment when we observe the distribution of customers’ decisions.

Chaos gets narrowed down by referring to µ, or the arithmetical average of all the moments studied. This is the expression (x – µ)2or the local variance, observable in the moment x. In order to have an arithmetical average, and have it the same in all the moments ‘x’, we need to close the frame, i.e. to define the set of x’s. Essentially, we are saying to that initial chaos: ‘Look, chaos, it is time to pull yourself together a bit, and so we peg down the set of moments you contain, we draw an average of all those moments, and that average is sort of the point where 50% of you, chaos, is being taken and recognized, and we position every moment xregarding its distance from the average moment µ’.

Thus, the initial chaos ‘e power x’ gets dressed a little, into ‘e power (x – µ)2‘. Still, a dressed chaos is still chaos. Now, there is that old intuition, progressively unfolded by Isaac Newton, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnizand Abraham de Moivreat the verge of the 17thand 18thcenturies, then grounded by Carl Friedrich Gauss, and Thomas Bayes: chaos is a metaphysical concept born out of insufficient understanding, ‘cause your average reality, babe, has patterns and structures in it.

The way that things structure themselves is most frequently sort of a mainstream fashion, that most events stick to, accompanied by fringe phenomena who want to be remembered as the rebels of their time (right, space-time). The mainstream fashion is observable as an expected value. The big thing about maths is being able to discover by yourself that when you add up all the moments in the apparent chaos, and then you divide the so-obtained sum by the number of moments added, you get a value, which we call arithmetical average, and which actually doesn’t exist in that set of moments, but it sets the mainstream fashion for all the moments in that apparent chaos. Moments tend to stick around the average, whose habitual nickname is ‘µ’.

Once you have the expected value, you can slice your apparent chaos in two, sort of respectively on the right, and on the left of the expected value that doesn’t actually exist. In each of the two slices you can repeat the same operation: add up everything, then divide by the number of items in that everything, and get something expected that doesn’t exist. That second average can have two, alternative properties as for structuring. On the one hand, it can set another mainstream, sort of next door to that first mainstream: moments on one side of the first average tend to cluster and pile up around that second average. Then it means that we have another expected value, and we should split our initial, apparent chaos into two separate chaoses, each with its expected value inside, and study each of them separately. On the other hand, that second average can be sort of insignificant in its power of clustering moments: it is just the average (expected) distance from the first average, and we call it standard deviation, habitually represented with the Greek sigma.

We have the expected distance (i.e. standard deviation) from the expected value in our apparent chaos, and it allows us to call our chaos for further tidying up. We go and slice off some parts of that chaos, which seem not to be really relevant regarding our mainstream. Firstly, we do it by dividing our initial logarithm, being the local variance (x – µ)2, by twice the general variance, or two times sigma power two. We can be even meaner and add a minus sign in front of that divided local variance, and it means that instead of expanding our constant e = 2,71828, into a larger space, we are actually folding it into a smaller space. Thus, we get a space much smaller than the initial ‘e power (x – µ)2‘.

Now, we progressively chip some bits out of that smaller, folded space. We divide it by the standard deviation. I know, technically we multiply it by one divided by standard deviation, but if you are like older than twelve, you can easily understand the equivalence here. Next, we multiply the so-obtained quotient by that funny constant: one divided by the square root of two times π. This constant is 0,39894228 and if my memory is correct is was a big discovery from the part of Carl Friedrich Gauss: in any apparent chaos, you can safely narrow down the number of the realistically possible occurrences to like four tenths of that initial chaos.

After all that chipping we did to our initial, charmingly chaotic ‘e power x‘ space, we get the normal space, or that contained under the curve of normal distribution. This is what the whole theory of probability, and its rich pragmatic cousin, statistics, are about: narrowing down the range of uncertain, future occurrences to a space smaller than ‘anything can happen’. You can do it in many ways, i.e. we have many different statistical distributions. The normal one is like the top dog in that yard, but you can easily experiment with the steps described above and see by yourself what happens. You can kick that Gaussian constant 0,39894228 out of the equation, or you can make it stronger by taking away the square root and just keep two times π in its denominator; you can divide the local variance (x – µ)2just by one time its cousin general variance instead of twice etc. I am persuaded that this is what Carl Friedrich Gaussdid: he kept experimenting with equations until he came up with something practical.

And so am I, I mean I keep experimenting with equations so as to come up with something practical. I am applying all that elaborate philosophy of harnessed chaos to my EneFinthing and to predicting the number of my customers. As I am using normal distribution as my basic, quantitative screwdriver, I start with assuming that however many customers I got, that however many is always a fraction (percentage) of a total population. This is what statistical distributions are meant to yield: a probability, thus a fraction of reality, elegantly expressed as a percentage.

I take a planning horizon of three years, just as I do in the Business Planning Calculator, that analytical tool you can download from a subpage of https://discoversocialsciences.com. In order to make my curves smoother, I represent those three years as 36 months. This is my set of moments ‘x’, ranging from 1 to 36. The expected, average value that does not exist in that range of moments is the average time that a typical potential customer, out there, in the total population, needs to try and buy energy via EneFin. I have no clue, although I have an intuition. In the research on innovative activity in the realm of renewable energies, I have discovered something like a cycle. It is the time needed for the annual number of patent applications to double, with respect to a given technology (wind, photovoltaic etc.). See Time to come to the ad rem, for example, for more details. That cycle seems to be 7 years in Europe and in the United States, whilst it drops down to 3 years in China.

I stick to 7 years, as I am mostly interested, for the moment, in the European market. Seven years equals 7*12 = 84 months. I provisionally choose those 84 months as my average µfor using normal distribution in my forecast. Now, the standard deviation. Once again, no clue, and an intuition. The intuition’s name is ‘coefficient of variability’, which I baptise ßfor the moment. Variability is the coefficient that you get when you divide standard deviation by the mean average value. Another proportion. The greater the ß, the more dispersed is my set of customers into different subsets: lifestyles, cities, neighbourhoods etc. Conversely, the smaller the ß, the more conformist is that population, with relatively more people sailing in the mainstream. I casually assume my variability to be found somewhere in 0,1 ≤ ß ≤ 2, with a step of 0,1. With µ = 84, that makes my Ω (another symbol for sigma, or standard deviation) fall into 0,1*84 ≤ Ω ≤ 2*84 <=> 8,4 ≤ Ω ≤ 168. At ß = 0,1 => Ω = 8,4my customers are boringly similar to each other, whilst at ß = 2 => Ω = 168they are like separate tribes.

In order to make my presentation simpler, I take three checkpoints in time, namely the end of each consecutive year out of the three. Denominated in months, it gives: the 12thmonth, the 24thmonth, and the 36thmonth. I Table 1, below, you can find the results: the percentage of the market I expect to absorb into EneFin, with the average time of behavioural change in my customers pegged at µ = 84, and at various degrees of disparity between individual behavioural changes.

Table 1 Simulation of absorption in the market, with the average time of behavioural change equal to µ = 84 months

Percentage of the market absorbed
Variability of the population Standard deviation with µ = 84 12th month 24 month 36 month
0,1 8,4 8,1944E-18 6,82798E-13 7,65322E-09
0,2 16,8 1,00458E-05 0,02% 0,23%
0,3 25,2 0,18% 0,86% 2,93%
0,4 33,6 1,02% 3,18% 7,22%
0,5 42 2,09% 5,49% 10,56%
0,6 50,4 2,92% 7,01% 12,42%
0,7 58,8 3,42% 7,80% 13,18%
0,8 67,2 3,67% 8,10% 13,28%
0,9 75,6 3,74% 8,09% 13,02%
1 84 3,72% 7,93% 12,58%
1,1 92,4 3,64% 7,67% 12,05%
1,2 100,8 3,53% 7,38% 11,50%
1,3 109,2 3,41% 7,07% 10,95%
1,4 117,6 3,28% 6,76% 10,43%
1,5 126 3,14% 6,46% 9,93%
1,6 134,4 3,02% 6,18% 9,47%
1,7 142,8 2,89% 5,91% 9,03%
1,8 151,2 2,78% 5,66% 8,63%
1,9 159,6 2,67% 5,42% 8,26%
2 168 2,56% 5,20% 7,91%

I think it is enough science for today. That sunlight will not enjoy itself. It needs me to enjoy it. I am consistently delivering good, almost new science to my readers, and love doing it, and I am working on crowdfunding this activity of mine. As we talk business plans, I remind you that you can download, from the library of my blog, the business plan I prepared for my semi-scientific project Befund  (and you can access the French versionas well). You can also get a free e-copy of my book ‘Capitalism and Political Power’ You can support my research by donating directly, any amount you consider appropriate, to my PayPal account. You can also consider going to my Patreon pageand become my patron. If you decide so, I will be grateful for suggesting me two things that Patreon suggests me to suggest you. Firstly, what kind of reward would you expect in exchange of supporting me? Secondly, what kind of phases would you like to see in the development of my research, and of the corresponding educational tools?

Support this blog

€10,00

Le modèle d’un marché relativement conformiste

C’est l’un de ces moments quand beaucoup d’idées se bousculent dans ma tête, et lorsque je dis « bousculent », je veux dire qu’il y a vraiment des coups de coude là-dedans. Dans une situation comme celle-ci, j’ai deux façons de procéder. Tout d’abord, je peux regarder chaque idée séparée de près, énumérer toutes ces idées séparées etc. Bref, je peux être Aristotélicien. Ensuite, je peux considérer la situation présente comme un phénomène, façon Husserl ou Gadamer : ce qui se passe maintenant c’est moi qui pense à tous ces trucs différents, donc le mieux que je puisse faire est de se concentrer sur le phénomène de moi qui pense à tous ces trucs différents.

Ce chemin phénoménologique a un certain charme que je ne manque pas d’apprécier. Néanmoins, il y a un petit piège à éviter dès le début et le piège consiste à se concentrer sur la question « qu’est-ce que je pense ? ». La question qui ouvre vraiment une nouvelle porte c’est « comment est-ce que je pense ? ». Je pense comme si je circulais dans du trafic dense : mon esprit slalome parmi les différents projets et différentes idées qui s’y attachent. Ce slalom, il commence à m’agacer. Quelle est la conclusion ou bien l’observation générale que je peux tirer du travail de recherche que j’ai effectué depuis que j’eus publié le business plan du projet BeFund ? Tout ce travail relatif au projet EneFin, au carrefour de l’industrie FinTech et du marché de l’énergie, comment puis-je le résumer, jusqu’alors ?

Point de vue utilitaire, le travail fait sur ces deux concepts d’entreprise consécutifs – BeFund et EneFin –  m’a fait penser à créer un outil relativement simple de planification, pour pouvoir tester des concepts d’entreprise d’une façon structurée. C’est ainsi que j’ai créé, la semaine dernière, cet outil de calcul et planification pour préparer un business plan. Si vous cliquez ce lien hypertexte que je viens de donner, vous atterrissez sur une sous-page du blog Discover Social Scienceset là, vous pouvez télécharger directement le fichier Excel avec ce que j’appelle, pour le moment, « Business Planning Calculator ».

Point de vue théorie, je viens de découvrir cette connexion étrange entre le nombre d’inventions déposées pour breveter, dans le domaine d’énergies renouvelables, d’une part, et la taille du marché d’énergies renouvelables (consultez, par exemple : Je corrèleainsi que Time to come to the ad rem). Ces corrélations que j’ai découvertes, je ne sais même pas encore comment les appeler, tellement elles sont bizarroïdes. Faute d’une meilleure étiquette scientifique, j’appelle ce phénomène « la banalisation des technologies de génération d’énergies renouvelables ».

C’est ainsi que je suis en train de préparer un business plan pour le projet EneFin(consultez Traps and loopholeset Les séquences, ça me pousse à poser cette sorte des questions) et en même temps j’essaie de développer une interprétation scientifiquement cohérente de ce phénomène de banalisation des technologies. J’espère que ces deux créneaux de travail intellectuel vont se joindre l’un à l’autre. J’ai beau être un passionné de la science, la dissonance cognitive ça me tue parfois, lorsque c’est trop intense.

Bon, fini de geindre. Je me prends au boulot. J’ouvre « Business Planning Calculator » et je fais une copie de ce fichier Excel, spécialement pour le projet EneFin. La première table du calculateur me demande de préciser les produits que je veux vendre. Je m’en tiens aux trois cas de référence que j’avais déjà décrit, de façon sommaire, sur ce blog : la société américaine Square Inc., la société canadienne Katipultainsi que la société allemande FinTech Group AG. EneFin serait une fonctionnalité type Blockchain, dotée de la capacité de créer et de mettre en circulation des contrats intelligents complexes, sous la forme des tokens d’une crypto-monnaie. Chaque contrat serait un produit à part. Vous pouvez trouver un résumé de l’idée dans les illustrations ci-dessous.

 Contrat complexe EneFin

Contrat EneFin 2

Prix du contrat EneFin

Maintenant, il y a un choix stratégique à faireen ce qui concerne le développement et l’appropriation de la technologie. Option A : EneFin se contente d’organiser le marché, tout en utilisant une base technologique externe, par exemple celle d’Ethereum. Option B : EneFin crée sa propre technologie de base, une sorte de kernel (noyau) du système informatique, et développe des fonctionnalités particulières sur la base dudit kernel. Option A s’associe plutôt avec le modèle d’entreprise de Square Inc.et sur la base de ce que je sais à leur sujet (consultez The smaller more and more in FinTechet Plus ou moins les facteurs associés) les économies d’échelle sont cruciales dans ce chemin stratégique et encore, même avec la tout à fait respectable échelle d’opérations chez Square ne garantit pas de succès financier. Option B, en revanche, c’est plutôt le schéma de chez Katipultou bien chez FinTech Group AGet là, les résultats financiers de ceux deux business semblent prometteurs.

Ce que je vais donc faire c’est une boucle d’analyse. Je commence par construire in business plan pour l’Option A, donc pour un concept d’entreprise où mon produit sera le contrat complexe façon EneFin et son prix sera la marge de commission sur chaque transaction. Ceci va me conduire à bâtir un modèle analytique qui simule combien de marge brute le projet va générer en fonction des facteurs primordiaux : des prix d’électricité, de la quantité d’énergie mise en échange à travers EneFin ainsi que de la valeur des titres participatifs associés, du nombre des clients individuels ainsi que du nombre des participants institutionnels.

Une fois ce pas franchi, je passerai à l’estimation des frais fixes d’entreprise et à la décision si la marge transactionnelle, à elle seule, sera la source suffisante de revenu pour dégager une de bénéfice opérationnel d’au moins 20% sur les frais fixes. Si la réponse sera « oui », le business plan pour Option A sera un concept autonome et dans ce cas je développerai Option B comme une extension possible. Dans le cas contraire, donc si la marge brute dégagée sur la commission transactionnelle sera moins que 20% au-dessus des frais fixes, j’incorporerai l’Option B comme partie intégrante du projet et je referai le business plan du début.

Je commence mon analyse en formulant une équation de départ. C’est un réflexe chez les économistes. D’autres gens engagent la conversation avec une blague ou bien par une remarque anodine comme « Ne fait-il pas beau aujourd’hui ? ». Nous, les économistes, on engage avec une équation. La mienne, vous pouvez la voir ci-dessous :

Equation de marge brute EneFin 1

Le truc qui semble être le plus intéressant côté science, dans cette équation, c’est la dernière partie, donc cette fonction f(CME*N)qui transforme une population autrement innocente des consommateurs d’énergie en clients d’EneFin. Cette fonction transforme une consommation agrégée d’énergie en un marché à exploiter. Donc, à priori, j’ai une quantité en kilowatt heures, qui peut se sentir plus confortable en mégawatt ou même en des gigawatt heures, par ailleurs, et cette quantité se transforme en trois facteurs distincts à voir de l’autre côté du signe d’égalité : une quantité des contrats complexes façon EneFin, un prix unitaire pour un contrat et enfin en la marge de commission d’EneFin. Cette dernière, en fait, est aussi un prix, relatif au prix unitaire des contrats. J’ai donc une quantité et deux prix.

Je commence par dériver la quantité Qdes contrats, de l’agrégat CME*Net je commence ce commencement en le représentant la fonction f(CME*N)comme un processus de décision. Dans la population de N clients potentiels, certains vont décider d’acheter leur énergie – ainsi que des titres de participation dans le capital des fournisseurs d’énergie – à travers le système EneFin, d’autres vont s’en abstenir. Les certains qui vont être partants pour EneFin vont se subdiviser en des certains qui décideront d’acheter toute leur énergie à travers EneFin, d’une part, et en des certains qui vont acheter juste une partie de leur énergie par ce moyen. Ces deux sous-ensembles des certains se subdiviseront suivant une séquence temporelle : certains parmi certains vont se décider plutôt vite pendant que d’autres certains parmi des certains vont y aller mollo, à pas de balade.

Decisions des clients EneFin 1

Comme l’eut écrit Milton Friedman, les hypothèses, une fois qu’on s’y prend sérieusement à les formuler, elles débordent. Faut se concentrer sur ce qui est possible à exprimer d’une façon plus ou moins vérifiable. Je décide donc de simuler trois formes possibles de la fonctionf(CME*N). Premièrement, suivant les assomptions déjà classiques de Robertson, je construis une fonction d’absorption d’innovation, où la population des clients d’EneFinse développe comme une fraction croissante de la population totale N, suivant la logique de la distribution normale (Gaussienne). C’est essentiellement le scénario où une fois une personne opte pour EneFin, c’est un choix complet : la personne en question commence à acheter toute leur énergie à travers EneFin. Les deux paramètres de cette fonction sont Gaussiens, donc le temps moyen qu’un client de la population N prend à se décider pour EneFin, ainsi que la déviation standard de ce temps. Deuxièmement, je construis un scénario un peu à l’opposé de ce premier, où les clients sont plutôt réticents et conservatifs et leur comportement peut être représenté avec la distribution de Poisson, appelée parfois « la distribution d’évènements rares ». Là, j’ai besoin de juste un paramètre, c’est-à-dire le temps moyen de décision dans un client typique.

Troisièmement, j’essaie de tirer au milieu, parmi le scénario relativement optimiste de la progression Gaussienne et celui, relativement pessimiste, de la distribution de Poisson. Pour le faire, je retiens la structure logique de la progression Gaussienne, mais je change légèrement les assomptions en ce qui concerne les décisions individuelles. Au lieu d’assumer qu’une fois qu’un consommateur se décide d’utiliser EneFin, il ou elle achète toute son énergie à travers ce système, j’assume des achats partiels. Cette fois, tout consommateur peut acheter des pourcentages variables de leur consommation individuelle d’énergie sur EneFin. Mathématiquement, cela veut dire que je retiens la distribution normale comme fonction de base mais je change l’ensemble de définition, ou, si vous voulez, l’ensemble des abscisses « x » de ma fonction : je remplace l’ensemble Ndes clients par l’ensemble des kilowatt heures consommées, donc par CME*N. Comme c’est du Gaussien, j’ai les mêmes paramètres que dans mon premier scénario : le temps moyen d’absorption d’une kilowatt heure moyenne et la déviation standard de cette moyenne.

La grande question, avec ces simulations, est comment établir la valeur des paramètres. Je pense à utiliser ce que j’avais découvert à propos de la dynamique des technologies éoliennes, en particulier celles des turbines à l’axe vertical (consultez Je corrèleet Time to come to the ad rem). Apparemment, en phase d’expansion de cette technologie, le nombre des demandes de brevet qui y correspondent doublait en 7 ans en Europe et aux États-Unis, et ça prenait 3 ans en Chine. Là, je suis en train d’avancer à tâtons, mais je besoin d’un point d’attache raisonnable. Je prends ces 7 ans comme temps moyen d’un cycle technologique qui survient dans le domaine des énergies renouvelables et je le transpose dans mes trois fonctions d’absorption.

J’ai donc un horizon de planification de trois ans, dans mon « Business Planning Calculator ». Je transforme ça en mois, pour étirer mon ensemble de définition, donc j’ai 36 mois. J’ai u cycle d’absorption de 7 ans = 7*12 = 84 mois. J’assume que la fonction Gaussienne de base serait une fonction standard, où la déviation standard est égale à la moyenne. Je teste rapidement si ça tient débout, tout ça. Eh bien, ça tient, mais en partie seulement : la fonction Gaussienne marche comme outil de prédiction avec ces assomptions, mais la distribution de Poisson rend, sur ces 3 années de planification, des pourcentages indéfiniment petits du marché : 0,000000288% après trois ans. Je comprends maintenant pourquoi Robertson avait opté pour la distribution normale.

Je dis donc au revoir à Poisson, j’en reste à la distribution de Gauss, et cela veut dire que je retiens les scénarios 1 et 2, donc une migration progressive des clients vers EneFin, soit selon le modèle « tout ou rien » (scénario 1) ou bien selon la philosophie de mettre ses œufs dans des paniers différents et voir ce qui se passe (scénario 2). Je commence à jouer avec les paramètres. J’ai déjà calculé le pourcentage du marché possible à absorber dans la distribution Gaussienne standard où la déviation standard est égale à la moyenne. Je formule deux autres hypothèses pour voir la différence. D’une part, je simule le comportement d’un marché plutôt conformiste, où la grande majorité des clients est près de la moyenne, donc la déviation standard est égale à la moitié de ladite moyenne. D’autre part, j’imagine une population très diversifiée en termes des schémas de comportement, avec les ailes de la courbe de Gauss relativement étirées, donc où la déviation standard est égale à deux fois la moyenne.

Vous pouvez voir les résultats de ces tests dans Tableau 1, ci-dessous. Il me semble que les pourcentages dans les colonnes des côtés (distribution standard et la distribution dispersée) sont trop élevés pour être réalistes. En revanche, ceux dans la colonne du milieu semblent plus proches de la vie réelle. Je retiens donc le modèle d’un marché relativement conformiste et je vais jouer encore avec les paramètres pour étudier la sensitivité de mon modèle de marketing au choix des assomptions.

Tableau 1

  Pourcentage du marché absorbé dans la plateforme EneFin
  Absorption Gaussienne standard ; déviation standard = la moyenne Absorption Gaussienne conformiste ; déviations standard = 0,5 de la moyenne Absorption Gaussienne conformiste ; déviations standard = 2 fois la moyenne
Fin de l’année 1 19,6% 4,3% 33,4%
Fin de l’année 2 23,8% 7,7% 36,0%
Fin de l’année 3 28,4% 12,7% 38,8%

Je continue à vous fournir de la bonne science, presque neuve, juste un peu cabossée dans le processus de conception. Je vous rappelle que vous pouvez télécharger le business plan du projet BeFund(aussi accessible en version anglaise). Vous pouvez aussi télécharger mon livre intitulé “Capitalism and Political Power”. Je veux utiliser le financement participatif pour me donner une assise financière dans cet effort. Vous pouvez soutenir financièrement ma recherche, selon votre meilleur jugement, à travers mon compte PayPal. Vous pouvez aussi vous enregistrer comme mon patron sur mon compte Patreon. Si vous en faites ainsi, je vous serai reconnaissant pour m’indiquer deux trucs importants : quel genre de récompense attendez-vous en échange du patronage et quelles étapes souhaitiez-vous voir dans mon travail ?

 

Vous pouvez donner votre support financier à ce blog

€10,00

Something to exploit subsequently

In my last three updates, I’ve been turning around one specific topic, namely the technology of wind turbines with vertical axis. Like three updates ago, in Ma petite turbine éolienne à l’axe vertical, I opened up on to the topic by studying the case of a particular invention, filed for patenting, with the European Patent Office, by a group of Slovakian inventors. Just in order to place this one in a broader context, I did some semantic rummaging, with the help of https://patents.google.com. I basically wanted to count how many such inventions had been filed for patenting in different regions of the world. In my research I have been using, for years, the number of patent applications as a metric of aggregate effort in invention, and so I did regarding those wind turbines with vertical axis.

This is when it started to turn weird. Apparently, invention in this specific field follows a stunningly regular trend, and is just as stunningly correlated with the metrics of renewable energies: the share of renewables in the overall output of energy (see Time to come to the ad rem) and the aggregate output of said renewables, in metric tons of oil equivalent (see Je corrèle). When I say ‘stunningly correlated’, I really mean it. In social sciences, coefficients of correlation around r = 0,95happen in truly rare cases, and when they happen, the first reflex of a serious social scientist is to assume that something is messed up in the source data. This is one of those cases. I am still trying to wrap my mind around the fact that the semantic incidence of some logical constructs in patent applications can coincide so strongly with the fundamental metrics of energy consumption.

In this update, I want to return to that business concept of mine, the EneFinproject. I am preparing a business plan for this one. Actually I have been preparing it for weeks, which you can find the track of in the past posts on this blog. Long story short, EneFinis the concept of a FinTech utility, which would allow the creators of new projects in the field of renewable energies to acquire capital, via a scheme combining the sales of futures contracts, on the future output of the business, with the issuance of equity. You can find more explanation in Traps and loopholes, for example.

I want to study this particular case, that wind turbine described in the patent application no. EP 3 214 303 A1, under the EneFinangle. How can a FinTech scheme like the one I am coming up with work for a business based on this particular invention? I start with figuring out the kind of business structure to build around this invention. Wind turbines with vertical axis are generally small stuff, distinctive from their bulky cousins with horizontal axis by the fact they can work in close proximity to human habitat. A wind turbine with vertical axis is something you can essentially install in your yard, and it you will be just fine together, provided there is enough wind in your yard. As for this particular aspect, the quick technological research that I documented in Ma petite turbine éolienne à l’axe vertical, showed that the really interesting places for using wind turbines with vertical axis are, for example, the coastal regions of Europe, with the average wind speed like 12 to 13 metres per second. With that amount of Aeol, this particular turbine starts being serious, at more than 1 MW of electrical capacity. Mind you, it doesn’t have to be coastal, that place where you install it. The upper storeys of a skyscraper, hilltops – in general all the places where you cannot expect your straw hat to hold on your head without a ribbon tied under your chin – are the right place to use that device shaped like a DNA helix.

This particular technology is unlikely to breed power plants in the traditional sense of the term. The whole idea of wind turbines with vertical axis is to make it more apt to being installed in the immediate vicinity of human habitat. You can install them completely scattered or a bit clustered, for example on the roof of a building. I am wrapping my mind around the practical idea, and I start the wrapping by doing two things: maths and pictures. As for maths, PW = ½ * Cp* p * A * v3is the general name of the game. ‘PW’ stands for electric power of a wind turbine with vertical axis, and said power stands on air, which has a density p = 1,225 kg/m3divided by half, so basically that air is dense, in the equation, at sort of p = 0,6125 kg/m3. Whatever speed of wind ‘v’ that air blows at, in this particular equation it blows at the third power of that speed, or v3. That half the density of air, multiplied by the cubic expression of wind speed, is the exogenous force that Mother Nature supplies here and now.

What Mother Nature supplies is being taken on the blades on the turbine, with a working surface of ‘A’, and that surface works with an average efficiency of Cp. That efficiency is technically comprised between 0 and 1, and actually, for this specific type of machine, between 59% and 72% (consult Bhutta et al.2012[1]), which I average at 65,5%. All in all, with that density of air cut by half and efficiency being what it is, my average wind turbine with vertical axis can take like 40,1% of the arithmetical product ‘working surface of the blades times wind speed power three’. Reminder, from school: power first, multiplication next. I mean, don’t raise to cubic power the product of wind speed and blade surface. Wind speed cubic power first, then multiply by the blades.

I pass to pictures, now. A picture is mostly a picture of something, even if that something is just in my mind. My first something is a place I like very much: Lisbon, Portugal, and more specifically the district of Belem, a good kick westwards from the Praca de Comercio. It is beautiful, and really windy. Here below, I am giving a graphical idea of how those small wind turbines with vertical axis could be located. Reminder: each of them, according to the prototype in the patent application no. EP 3 214 303 A1, needs like 5 m2of space to work. Let’s make it 20 m2, just to allow the wind to pass between those wind turbines.

belem-tower-2809818_1280

In Lisbon, the average speed of wind is 10 mph, or 4,47 m/s, and that gives an exogenous energy of the wind like 54,72 kilowatts, to take whoever can take it. That prototype has real working surface of its blades like A = 1,334 m2, which gives, at the end of the day, an electric power of PW = 47,81 kW. In Portugal, the average consumption of energy at the level of households (so transport and industry excluded) seems to be like 4 214,55 kWh a year per person. I divide it by 8760 in your basic year (the odd ones make 8784 hours), which yields 0,48 kW required per person. My wind turbine could power 99 people in their household needs. If they start using that juice for transport, like charging their electric cars, or the batteries of their electric bicycles, that 99 could drop to 50 – 60, probably not less.

Hence, what my mind is wrapping around, right now, is a business that would manage the installation and exploitation of wind turbines with vertical axis, in groups of a few dozens of people, so like 20 – 50 households. Good, let’s try to move on: Lyon, France. Not very coastal, as the nearest sea is more than 300 km away, but: a) it is quite windy, due to the specific circulation of air along the valleys of two rivers, Rhône and Saône b) they are reconstructing a whole district, namely the Confluenceone, as a smart city c) I f*****g love the place. Average wind speed over the year: 4,6 m/s, which allows Mother Nature to supply around 52,25 kWto my prototype. The prototype is supposed to serve a population, where the average person needs 7 291,18 kWh for household use, whence 63 people being servedby my prototype, which could drop like to 20 – 30 people, if said people power their transportation devices with their household juice.

Lyon

Good, last shot: Amsterdam. Never been there, mind you, but they are coastal, statistically speaking quite energy consuming, and apparently keen on innovation. The average wind speed there is 5,14 m/s, which makes my prototype generate a power of 72,72 kilowatts. With the average Dutch consuming around 8 369,15 kWh for household use, 76 such average Dutch could use one such turbine.

 Amsterdam with text

Maths and pictures made me clarify a business concept, or rather two business concepts. Concept #1is simple manufacturing of those wind turbines. Here, EneFin(see Traps and loopholesand the subsequent ones) does not really fit. I remind you that the EneFin concept is based on the observable discrepancy between two categories of final prices for electricity: those for big institutional users (low), and those for households and small businesses (high). Long story short, EneFin takes its appeal from the coincidence of very different prices for the same good (i.e. electricity), and from the juicy margin of value added hidden behind that coincidence. That Concept #1 is essentially industrial, and the value added to expect does not really blow one’s hat off. Neither should we expect any significant price discrepancy between categories of customers. Besides, whilst futures contracts on electricity are already widely practiced in the wholesale market, and the EneFin concept just attempts to transfer the idea to the retail market, I haven’t seen much use of futures contracts in the market of typical industrial products.

Concept #2, for exploiting this particular invention, would be complex, combining the engineering of those turbines so as to make the best version for the given location, their installation, then maintenance and management. The business entity in question would combine manufacturing, management of a value chain, site management, design and engineering, and maintenance. Here, that essentially cooperative version of the EneFinconcept would have more space to breathe. We can imagine a site, made of 200 households, who commission an independent company to engineer a local power system, based on wind turbines with vertical axis, to install, manage, and maintain that facility. In the price paid for particular components of that complex business scheme, those customers could progressively buy into that business entity.

Now, I am following another one of my research routines: I am deconstructing the business model. As truly enlightened a social thinker, I am searching online for the phrase ‘wind turbine investor relations’. To the mildly initiated: publicly listed companies have to maintain a special type of website, called, precisely ‘Investor Relations’, where they publish information about their business cuisine. This is where you can find annual reports, for example. The advantage of following this specific track is the easy access to information I am looking for, like the basic financials. The caveat is that I am browsing through relatively big businesses, big enough to be listed publicly, at least. Hence, I am skipping all the stories of small businesses.

Thus, the data my internal curious ape can find by peeling those ‘investor relations’ bananas is representative for relatively big, somehow established business structures. It can serve to build something like a target vision of what is likely to be created, in a particular field of business, after the early childhood of a project is over. And so I asked dr Google, and, just to make sure, I cross-asked dr Yandex, what they can tell me if I ask around for ‘wind turbine investor relations’. Both yielded more or less the same list of top hits: Nordex,VestasSiemens Gamesa, Senvion,LM Wind Power,  SkyWolf, and Arise. I collected their annual reports, with the exception of SkyWolf, which, for some reason, does not publish any on their ‘investor relations’ page. I followed this particular suspect home, I asked around who are they hanging with, and so I came to visiting their page at Nasdaq, and I finally got it. They are at the stage of their IPO (Initial Public Offering), so they are still sort of timid in annual reporting. Still, I could download their preliminary prospectus for that IPO, dated April 20th2018.

There is that thing about annual reports and prospectuses: they are both disclosure and public relations. Technically, an annual report should, essentially, be reporting about the things material to the business in question. Still, this type of document is also used for, well… for the show. Reading an annual report is good training at reading between the lines, and, more generally, at figuring out how to figure out when people are lying.

Truth has patterns, and lies have patterns as well, although the patterns of truth are somehow more salient. The truth that I look for in annual reports is mostly in the financials. Here is a first glimpse of these:

Revenues Net profit (loss) Assets Equity Ratio assets to revenue
Nordex 2017 EUR mlns 3 127,40 0,30 2 807,60 919,00 0,90
Vestas 2017 EUR mlns 9 953,00 894,00 10 871,00 3 112,00 1,09
Siemens Gamesa 2017 EUR mlns 6 538,20 (135,00) 16 467,13 6 449,87 2,52
Senvion 2017 EUR mlns 1 889,90 (121,10) 1 808,10 230,10 0,96
LM Group 2016 EUR mlns 1 059,00 52,00 1 198,00 445,00 1,13
SkyWolf 2017 USD (!) 49 000 (592 600) 139 730 (673 500) 2,85

As I see it, the business of doing business on installing and managing local power installations can go in truly divergent directions. You can start as SkyWolf is starting, with a ‘debt to assets’ ratio akin to the best (worst?) years of General Motors, or you can have that comfy financial cushion supplied by a big mother ship, as it is the case for Siemens Gamesa. One pattern seems to emerge: the ‘assets to revenue’ ratio seems to oscillate around 1,00. In other words, each dollar invoiced on our customers needs to be backed up by one dollar in our balance sheet. Something to exploit subsequently.

I am consistently delivering good, almost new science to my readers, and love doing it, and I am working on crowdfunding this activity of mine. As we talk business plans, I remind you that you can download, from the library of my blog, the business plan I prepared for my semi-scientific project Befund  (and you can access the French versionas well). You can also get a free e-copy of my book ‘Capitalism and Political Power’ You can support my research by donating directly, any amount you consider appropriate, to my PayPal account. You can also consider going to my Patreon pageand become my patron. If you decide so, I will be grateful for suggesting me two things that Patreon suggests me to suggest you. Firstly, what kind of reward would you expect in exchange of supporting me? Secondly, what kind of phases would you like to see in the development of my research, and of the corresponding educational tools?

Support this blog

€10,00

[1]Muhammad Mahmood Aslam Bhutta, Nasir Hayat, Ahmed Uzair Farooq, Zain Ali, Sh. Rehan Jamil, Zahid Hussain (2012) Vertical axis wind turbine – A review of various configurations and design techniques, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16 (2012) 1926–1939

Je corrèle

Je pense à ces corrélations étrangement solides que j’avais identifiées en présentant ma dernière mise à jour en anglais : « Time to come to the ad rem ». Dans la science, il y a fréquemment des moments quand une structure qu’on espérait solide s’avère être carrément une illusion. Dans ce cas précis, c’est l’inverse : j’espérais trouver des relations de tout ce qu’il y a de plus accidentel et ce que j’ai effectivement trouvé est une structure solide comme du béton, à première vue. Alors voilà, je fus inspiré par la lecture de cette demande de brevet no. EP 3 214 303 A1déposée auprès de l’Office Européen des Brevets. C’est une turbine éolienne à l’axe vertical, donc un de ces trucs suffisamment petits pour être installés dans la proximité immédiate d’habitations humaines. En même temps, avec des vents que nous pouvons rencontrer dans les régions côtières, ce machin pourrait changer profondément l’accès à l’énergie (consultez Ma petite turbine éolienne à l’axe vertical). Une petite merveille.

Alors j’avais flâné un peu du côté de https://patents.google.comet j’avais fait une sélection sémantique des demandes de brevet dans le domaine des turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical. Comme c’était une recherche sémantique, donc par l’expression clé en anglais (« wind turbine with vertical axis »), je pensais que je vais tomber sur tout un tas des malentendus, par exemple des inventions qui concernent, en fait, des turbines à l’axe horizontal mais parlent de quelque chose à propos de l’axe vertical du mât principal. Cependant, au lieu de tout un tas de bruit statistique, j’étais tombé sur une régularité étonnante, tellement étonnante que je la reproduis une fois de plus, dans Tableau 1 ci-dessous :

Tableau 1

  Nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical
Année Office Européen des Brevets (EPO) % du total des demandes de brevet relatives à l’éolien, chez EPO US Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) % du total des demandes de brevet relatives à l’éolien, chez USPTO Office des Brevets de la République Populaire de Chine (CH) % du total des demandes de brevet relatives à l’éolien, chez CH
[a] [b] [c] [d] [e] [f] [g]
2001 616 41,5% 1266 38,5% 369 29,1%
2002 599 37,8% 1294 38,3% 478 27,0%
2003 645 37,6% 1491 40,0% 645 27,0%
2004 806 40,7% 1703 40,7% 961 29,9%
2005 821 41,7% 1744 38,8% 1047 25,7%
2006 937 44,1% 1999 39,4% 1553 27,6%
2007 960 40,0% 2150 38,4% 1844 27,3%
2008 1224 44,5% 2454 39,4% 2342 26,7%
2009 1445 45,4% 2813 40,2% 2497 22,8%
2010 1746 46,6% 3482 42,4% 3298 24,8%
2011 2006 44,9% 3622 39,3% 4139 23,1%
2012 1886 42,1% 3699 39,0% 4551 20,6%
2013 1781 41,8% 3829 39,2% 5307 20,2%
2014 1800 38,8% 4074 40,4% 5740 18,1%
2015 1867 42,5% 4013 40,2% 7870 19,6%
2016 1089 39,8% 3388 40,6% 9325 20,4%
2017 349 42,9% 2115 42,7% 9321 22,3%

Je pense que vous pouvez aisément deviner ce qui m’avait tellement étonné : les résultats d’une sélection sémantique qui aurait dû donner des nombres au moins quelque peu aléatoires montre quelque chose de presque irréellement cohérent. Pour ceux qui ne sont pas vraiment potes avec la recherche quantitative : croyez-moi, les nombres dans Tableau 1 sont tellement réguliers qu’ils ont l’air d’une simulation mathématique plutôt que d’un ensemble empirique des données.

Alors dans cette mise à jour en anglais – Time to come to the ad rem – j’ai étudié la corrélation entre ces nombres et le pourcentage de la consommation totale d’énergie provenant des sources renouvelables, respectivement pour l’UE, les États-Unis et la Chine. Encore une fois, surprise : des corrélations de Pearsonsolides comme des barres de fer. Comment est-ce que l’incidence d’un profil sémantique donné, dans un ensemble d’inventions, peut bien être corrélée avec la structure de consommation d’énergie à un niveau de r = 0,94 ? Allez savoir. Moi, ça continue de provoquer des démangeaisons chez mon singe curieux interne.

Je cherche dans la direction de consommation agrégée d’énergie renouvelable. Les calculs préliminaires, je les effectue avec les données publiées par la Banque Mondiale. Je prends donc les populations respectives de l’Union Européenne, des États-Unis et de la Chineet je les multiplie par le coefficient de consommation finale d’énergie par tête d’habitant. De cette façon j’obtiens la consommation agrégée d’énergie, en tonnes d’équivalent pétrole. Ensuite, je multiplie ça par le pourcentage de la consommation finale d’énergie dérivé des sources renouvelables. De tout en tout, j’atterris avec les données que vous pouvez trouver dans Tableau 2, ci-dessous.

 

Tableau 2

Année Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées en l’Union Européenne Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées aux États-Unis Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées en Chine continentale
2001 1 735 015 232 2 230 704 586 1 181 308 822
2002 1 732 427 984 2 255 943 576 1 260 951 639
2003 1 769 113 239 2 261 169 559 1 440 987 496
2004 1 787 505 277 2 307 767 983 1 643 595 354
2005 1 793 312 022 2 318 770 902 1 816 983 253
2006 1 800 278 875 2 296 824 886 1 986 422 995
2007 1 769 767 272 2 337 001 704 2 148 377 946
2008 1 762 246 130 2 277 080 529 2 216 020 807
2009 1 660 333 596 2 164 820 311 2 367 557 406
2010 1 725 188 226 2 215 223 615 2 614 842 137
2011 1 658 167 007 2 190 417 726 2 804 509 642
2012 1 645 249 820 2 156 975 857 2 910 970 303
2013 1 626 364 912 2 182 583 138 3 004 912 635
2014 1 564 974 842 2 216 186 625 3 051 503 511

 

Je corrèle. Je calcule le coefficient de corrélation de Pearson pour chaque paire des séries temporelles « Nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical du Tableau 1 ; Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées du Tableau 2 ». Union Européenne, corrélation r = -0,779703594 ; États-Unis r = -0,67424865 ; Chine r = 0,966634589. Me font ch**r, ces turbines, franchement. Elles mettent la tête à l’envers la plupart de ce que j’avais appris jusqu’alors en termes de méthodes de recherche empirique. Je veux dire que ces corrélations n’ont pas le droit d’exister. Elles sont définitivement trop significatives. Je veux les étudier pas à pas, et ce sera aussi une occasion rêvée pour jouer le prof en termes d’analyse quantitative.

Mon premier pas consiste à représenter chaque nombre comme une déviation de la moyenne arithmétique respective. Je sais, ça sonne sorcier, mais c’est simple comme tout. Vous pouvez faire de même avec tout ce qui est observable et mesurable : vous pouvez représenter chaque phénomène comme une déviation d’un état attendu. Notre cerveau le fait tout le temps, par ailleurs. Dans chaque série temporelle en question, je calcule sa moyenne arithmétique et ensuite je représente se nombre comme la différence (soustraction) entre ce nombre original et ladite moyenne. Vous pouvez trouver les résultats de cette opération dans Tableau 3, ci-dessous. Les valeurs entre parenthèses sont des négatives.

Tableau 3

  Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées – déviations de la moyenne Nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical – déviations de la moyenne
Année Union Européenne États-Unis Chine Union Européenne États-Unis Chine
2001 18 590 629,08 (12 971 913,79) (993 615 745,57) (617,71) (1 278,29) (2 114,64)
2002 16 003 381,53 12 267 076,21 (913 972 928,57) (634,71) (1 250,29) (2 005,64)
2003 52 688 636,34 17 493 059,21 (733 937 071,57) (588,71) (1 053,29) (1 838,64)
2004 71 080 674,76 64 091 483,21 (531 329 213,57) (427,71) (841,29) (1 522,64)
2005 76 887 419,60 75 094 402,21 (357 941 314,57) (412,71) (800,29) (1 436,64)
2006 83 854 272,45 53 148 386,21 (188 501 572,57) (296,71) (545,29) (930,64)
2007 53 342 669,61 93 325 204,21 (26 546 621,57) (273,71) (394,29) (639,64)
2008 45 821 527,04 33 404 029,21 41 096 239,43 (9,71) (90,29) (141,64)
2009 (56 091 006,47) (78 856 188,79) 192 632 838,43 211,29 268,71 13,36
2010 8 763 623,63 (28 452 884,79) 439 917 569,43 512,29 937,71 814,36
2011 (58 257 595,18) (53 258 773,79) 629 585 074,43 772,29 1 077,71 1 655,36
2012 (71 174 782,21) (86 700 642,79) 736 045 735,43 652,29 1 154,71 2 067,36
2013 (90 059 690,10) (61 093 361,79) 829 988 067,43 547,29 1 284,71 2 823,36
2014 (151 449 760,09) (27 489 874,79) 876 578 943,43 566,29 1 529,71 3 256,36
Moyenne 1 716 424 602,47 2 243 676 499,79 2 174 924 567,57 1 233,71 2 544,29 2 483,64

 

Les chiffres que vous pouvez voir dans Tableau 3 sont une première approche à la notion des moments de coïncidence. Je prends, par exemple, la paire des valeurs pour les États-Unis en 2006 : consommation des renouvelables 53 148 386,21 de tonnes au-dessus de la moyenne et les demandes de brevet pour les turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical 545,29 au-dessous de la moyenne. Ce moment de coïncidence particulier est comme négatif : mes deux valeurs empiriques dévient de leurs moyennes respectives dans des directions opposées.

Oui, je sais : comment peut-on avoir 0,29 d’une demande de brevet ? Eh ben, si, on peut, puisqu’une moyenne est essentiellement une valeur non-existante en réalité, et si nous soustrayons quelque chose qui n’existe pas de quelque chose qui existe, des fractions d’évènements apparaissent. Normal, v’zallez vous habituer.

Je prends un autre moment, celui de 2006 en Chine. Consommation des renouvelables (188 501 572,57) de tonnes au-dessous de la moyenne et les demandes de brevet pour les turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical (930,64) au-dessous de la moyenne : cette fois les deux déviations vont dans la même direction négative.

Nous avons donc un ensemble d’observations composé des moments de coïncidence. Nous pouvons poser deux sortes de questions. Premièrement, est-ce que ces moments que je viens de citer sont importants ou pas ? Vous savez, les coïncidences, y en a que nous ne remarquons même pas, comme tous ces électrons qui volent dans toutes les directions, et y en a qui pèsent, comme la rencontre accidentelle entre une voiture et un arbre. Est-ce qu’il y a, dans notre ensemble, des coïncidences plus importantes et moins importantes ? Deuxièmement, quelle est la cohérence et l’importance relative de tous ces moments de coïncidence observées dans Tableau 3 en comparaison à, par exemple, la coïncidence entre le fait qu’il pleut et celui que le trottoir soit mouillé ? Ce que je veux dire c’est que dans la science, nous commençons d’habitude avec un ensemble des coïncidences que nous essayons de comprendre en évaluant leur importance relative.

Mathématiquement, nous pouvons faire deux choses avec cet ensemble. D’une part, nous pouvons standardiser ces moments de coïncidence pour les rendre mutuellement comparables, et ensuite nous pouvons calculer, pour chaque moment standardisé, le coefficient économique d’élasticité : déviation relative dans variable A divisée par la déviation relative dans variable B. D’autre part, nous pouvons suivre le chemin typiquement statistique et calculer le coefficient de corrélation.

On y va mollo et on commence par le premier chemin, donc celui de standardisation et d’élasticité. Je standardise mes déviations avec les moyennes respectives de chaque série temporelle et donc je divise chaque déviation dans la colonne « Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées en l’Union Européenne » par la moyenne de cette valeur etc. Ce type de standardisation s’appelle « dénomination », pour être exact, puisque je standardise en transformant mes valeurs en des fractions à dénominateur commun. Vous pouvez voir les résultats de cette standardisation par dénomination dans Tableau 4, ci-dessous.

 

Tableau 4

  Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées – déviations de la moyenne divisées par la moyenne Nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical – déviations de la moyenne divisées par la moyenne
Année Union Européenne États-Unis Chine Union Européenne États-Unis Chine
2001  0,01  (0,01)  (0,46)  (0,50)  (0,50)  (0,85)
2002  0,01  0,01  (0,42)  (0,51)  (0,49)  (0,81)
2003  0,03  0,01  (0,34)  (0,48)  (0,41)  (0,74)
2004  0,04  0,03  (0,24)  (0,35)  (0,33)  (0,61)
2005  0,04  0,03  (0,16)  (0,33)  (0,31)  (0,58)
2006  0,05  0,02  (0,09)  (0,24)  (0,21)  (0,37)
2007  0,03  0,04  (0,01)  (0,22)  (0,15)  (0,26)
2008  0,03  0,01  0,02  (0,01)  (0,04)  (0,06)
2009  (0,03)  (0,04)  0,09  0,17  0,11  0,01
2010  0,01  (0,01)  0,20  0,42  0,37  0,33
2011  (0,03)  (0,02)  0,29  0,63  0,42  0,67
2012  (0,04)  (0,04)  0,34  0,53  0,45  0,83
2013  (0,05)  (0,03)  0,38  0,44  0,50  1,14
2014  (0,09)  (0,01)  0,40  0,46  0,60  1,31

 

Les valeurs standardisées nous donnent comme une meilleure idée de ces moments de coïncidence. Nous commençons à distinguer entre des coïncidences poids lourd – 2010 en Chine – et celles qui en sont au poids coq (2008 aux États-Unis). Maintenant, je vais un pas plus loin dans la standardisation : pour chaque moment de coïncidence je calcule le coefficient de la déviation relative en la consommation des renouvelables divisée par la déviation relative correspondante en nombre des demandes de brevet. Je dénomme le degré du pas commun en énergie en des unités du pas commun en inventions. Bien sûr, « déviation relative » veut dire que j’utilise les valeurs du Tableau 4. Je fais donc ce que les économistes appellent « calcul d’élasticité » : comment est-ce que la consommation des renouvelables dévie de sa moyenne en la présence d’une unité de déviation en nombre des demandes de brevet.  Vous pouvez retrouver ces élasticités dans Tableau 5, ci-dessous.

 

Tableau 5

  Élasticité locale des déviations en la consommation des renouvelables par rapport aux déviations locales en nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical 
Année Union Européenne États-Unis Chine
2001 (0,02) 0,01 0,54
2002 (0,02) (0,01) 0,52
2003 (0,06) (0,02) 0,46
2004 (0,12) (0,09) 0,40
2005 (0,13) (0,11) 0,28
2006 (0,20) (0,11) 0,23
2007 (0,14) (0,27) 0,05
2008 (3,39) (0,42) (0,33)
2009 (0,19) (0,33) 16,47
2010 0,01 (0,03) 0,62
2011 (0,05) (0,06) 0,43
2012 (0,08) (0,09) 0,41
2013 (0,12) (0,05) 0,34
2014 (0,19) (0,02) 0,31

 A partir du moment que j’ai ces élasticités, il y a des choses que je peux faire avec et des choses que je ne peux pas faire. Le premier truc que je peux faire c’est observer la distribution de ces élasticités dans le temps, l’histoire de voir à quel point elles restent dociles et prévisibles. Dans ce cas précis, c’est plutôt le cas ; avec l’exception de deux épisodes – Union Européenne en 2008 et Chine en 2009 – ces coefficients d’élasticité se composent en des séries très récurrentes. Une telle prévisibilité d’élasticités locales est déjà une bonne prédiction de la corrélation strictement dite.

Une bonne prédiction de corrélation n’est pas tout à fait le même truc que la corrélation per se. La différence réside dans la généralité. Je vous invite à faire une petite expérience avec les données du tableau 3 : répétez la même séquence analytique que moi j’avais faite, seulement standardisez ces déviations du Tableau 4 avec le maximum des deux catégories. Divisez donc chaque déviation en la consommation des renouvelables par la plus grande déviation dans cette catégorie en général, toutes régions géographiques confondues. Ensuite, faites de même pour les déviations en nombre des demandes de brevet. Vous verrez que les déviations standardisées et les élasticités seront significativement différentes des celles que je viens de présenter, quoi que les coïncidences locales ainsi exprimées formeront un modèle général similaire.

Conclusion : la méthode de standardisation par dénomination est intéressante pour capter des régularités à l’intérieur d’un ensemble d’observations empiriques mais elle est très sensible au choix du dénominateur, et, de ce fait, elle rend difficile la comparaison entre des recherches différentes menées par des chercheurs indépendants.

Alors moi, maintenant, je vais être un chercheur indépendant par rapport à moi-même. Je repars du début. Lorsque je vois une coïncidence, cela veut dire que deux choses changent en même temps. Dans ce changement coïncidentel, il y a deux niveaux. Les choses changent ensemble et chacune d’elles change à part, sous l’influence de quelques facteurs autres que cette coïncidence précise. Pour chaque moment de coïncidence dans Tableau 3, je fais donc deux calculs différents. D’une part, je multiplie la déviation absolue en la consommation des renouvelables par la déviation correspondante, la même année, en nombre des demandes de brevet. Ensuite, je tire la moyenne arithmétique des tous ces produits locaux (momentanés) : c’est la covariancede mes deux variables.

Je sais que dans cette covariance, il y a la composante des changements autonomes qui se cache. Pour chacune des séries temporelles je fais donc le suivant : j’élève au carré chaque déviation du Tableau 3 (pour se débarrasser des minus), je tire la moyenne arithmétique de ces carrés et dans un dernier pas je tire la racine carrée de cette moyenne. De cette façon j’obtiens la déviation standard de chaque série temporelle. A partir de là, je standardise (je divise) chaque covariance par le produit des déviations standard des séries temporelles correspondantes.

Compliqué ? Bon, je répète par petits bouts.

 Pas no. 1 : Covariance

 Déviation(Énergie renouvelable ; 2006)

*

Déviation (Demandes de brevet ; 2006)

= Covariance locale pour 2006

 Je fais de même pour chaque année. Dans ce cas précis, j’ai ainsi 14 covariances locales pour chacune des trois régions géographiques. Les voici dans Tableau 6 ci-dessous :

Tableau 6

  Covariances locales entre la consommation des renouvelables et le nombre des demandes de brevet
Année Union Européenne États-Unis Chine
2001 (11 483 697 161,28) 16 581 812 079,22 2 101 142 439 117,30
2002 (10 157 574 876,85) (15 337 350 146,78) 1 833 103 275 811,23
2003 (31 018 552 909,01) (18 425 189 369,56) 1 349 448 154 237,15
2004 (30 402 220 035,00) (53 919 249 235,56) 809 024 631 835,87
2005 (31 732 536 462,11) (60 096 977 314,92) 514 233 832 855,37
2006 (24 880 760 555,28) (28 981 055 739,99) 175 427 642 073,80
2007 (14 600 650 710,47) (36 796 794 804,49) 16 980 356 869,44
2008 (445 123 405,55) (3 015 906 637,63) (5 820 988 770,49)
2009 (11 851 228 367,01) (21 189 784 443,70) 2 573 024 341,87
2010 4 489 479 191,39 (26 680 676 533,35) 358 250 014 932,51
2011 (44 991 508 506,18) (57 397 741 348,49) 1 042 188 149 991,58
2012 (46 426 293 654,75) (100 114 470 805,28) 1 521 669 408 607,80
2013 (49 288 381 825,37) (78 487 514 648,42) 2 343 352 738 660,65
2014 (85 763 835 570,70) (42 051 654 172,20) 2 854 454 103 711,79
Covariance générale (moyenne) (27 753 777 489,15) (37 565 182 365,80) 1 065 430 484 591,13

Remarquez que les covariances locales en l’Union Européenne et les États-Unis sont généralement négatives, pendant qu’en Chine elles sont généralement positive. Ceci se reflète dans les covariances générales, qui sont les moyennes arithmétiques de leurs colonnes respectives.

 Pas no. 2 : Les déviations standard

{[Déviation (Énergie renouvelable ; 2006)]2}1/2

etc.

Je répète cette opération apparemment aberrante – tirer la racine carrée d’une puissance carrée – pour chaque déviation locale. J’obtiens un tableau des déviations locales standardisées de cette façon spécifique : Tableau 7 ci-dessous. Notez que cette fois la standardisation n’était pas une dénomination. Il n’était pas question de dénominateur commun. En revanche, cette standardisation particulière m’a permis de calculer chaque déviation comme un module de distance de la moyenne ; les chiffres dans Tableau 7 sont presque les mêmes que ceux dans Tableau 3, juste sans les minus. Je tire la moyenne de chaque colonne et j’ai ainsi les distances moyennes des moyennes respectives, donc les déviations standard.

Tableau 7

  Tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées – déviations locales standardisées comme racines carrés des puissances carrées Nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical – déviations locales standardisées comme racines carrés des puissances carrées
Année Union Européenne États-Unis Chine Union Européenne États-Unis Chine
2001  18 590 629,08  12 971 913,79  993 615 745,57  617,71  1 278,29  2 114,64
2002  16 003 381,53  12 267 076,21  913 972 928,57  634,71  1 250,29  2 005,64
2003  52 688 636,34  17 493 059,21  733 937 071,57  588,71  1 053,29  1 838,64
2004  71 080 674,76  64 091 483,21  531 329 213,57  427,71  841,29  1 522,64
2005  76 887 419,60  75 094 402,21  357 941 314,57  412,71  800,29  1 436,64
2006  83 854 272,45  53 148 386,21  188 501 572,57  296,71  545,29  930,64
2007  53 342 669,61  93 325 204,21  26 546 621,57  273,71  394,29  639,64
2008  45 821 527,04  33 404 029,21  41 096 239,43  9,71  90,29  141,64
2009  56 091 006,47  78 856 188,79  192 632 838,43  211,29  268,71  13,36
2010  8 763 623,63  28 452 884,79  439 917 569,43  512,29  937,71  814,36
2011  58 257 595,18  53 258 773,79  629 585 074,43  772,29  1 077,71  1 655,36
2012  71 174 782,21  86 700 642,79  736 045 735,43  652,29  1 154,71  2 067,36
2013  90 059 690,10  61 093 361,79  829 988 067,43  547,29  1 284,71  2 823,36
2014  151 449 760,09  27 489 874,79  876 578 943,43  566,29  1 529,71  3 256,36
Déviation standard (moyenne) 70 228 768,13 56 626 139,75 623 107 877,55 506,85 983,89 1 768,88

 

Pas no. 3 : Les corrélations Pearson entre les tonnes d’équivalent pétrole d’énergie renouvelable consommées et le nombre des demandes de brevet relatives aux turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical

 Je standardise encore une fois et cette fois, c’est encore de la dénomination. Je standardise chaque covariance générale en la mettant au-dessus d’un dénominateur complexe fait par la multiplication des déviations standard des variables covariantes. Notez que ça marche uniquement au niveau de la covariance générale et des déviations standard. Si vous faites le même truc au niveau des observations locales (chaque année séparément), donc si vous divisez la covariance locale en l’année X par le produit des déviations locales, standardisées comme en Pas no. 2, vous obtiendrez à chaque fois un coefficient égal à 1 ou bien à -1, ce qui ne vous avance pas vraiment en termes de recherche quantitative. Cela veut dire que la covariance locale explique toujours à 100% les variances locales combinées.

Nous faisons donc cette opération sur les valeurs générales et la voici pour chacune région géographique en question :

 Union Européenne<=> Covariance générale (Énergie et Demandes de Brevet) / [(Déviation standard Énergie) * (Déviation standard Demandes de Brevet)] = – 27 753 777 489,15 / (70 228 768,13 * 506,85)– 0,78

États-Unis <=> Covariance générale (Énergie et Demandes de Brevet) / [(Déviation standard Énergie) * (Déviation standard Demandes de Brevet)] =- 37 565 182 365,80 / (56 626 139,75 * 983,89) =  – 0,67                                             

 Chine <=> Covariance générale (Énergie et Demandes de Brevet) / [(Déviation standard Énergie) * (Déviation standard Demandes de Brevet)] = 1 065 430 484 591,13 / (623 107 877,55 * 1 768,88 = 0,97    

Maintenant, j’interprète. Le coefficient de corrélation de Pearson prend des valeurs à partir de -1 jusqu’à 1. On assume, un peu par une coutume statistique, que le coefficient entre – 0,3 et 0,3 n’est pas vraiment significatif, donc qu’il n’y a pas de corrélation véritable.

 Si la corrélation Pearson pour l’Union Européenne est de r = – 0,78, cela veut dire que la covariance générale explique 78% des déviations standard combinées et que la relation fonctionnelle est négative : plus de consommation des renouvelables est accompagnée d’un moins en termes de demandes de brevet et vice versa. On a le même type négatif dans le cas des États-Unis, mais en Chine c’est une relation fonctionnelle

 Ouff ! J’ai fini de faire le prof avec cette analyse de corrélation. Je viens de me rappeler que cette exposition avait aussi pour but de m’expliquer quelque chose à moi-même, c’est-à-dire d’où peut bien venir la force extraordinaire de ces corrélations. Je me suis avancé juste un peu, mais c’est toujours mieux que rien. La partie la plus informative de cette analyse pas par pas semble être le Tableau 5, donc celui avec les élasticités locales. En économie, les élasticités, ça compte vraiment lorsque ça s’approche de 1 ou dépasse 1. Dans le cas de l’Union Européenne, une élasticité de ce rang était observable en 2008, avec une montée en valeur depuis 2004. Aux États-Unis il y a quelque chose de similaire entre 2004 et 2009, seulement comme moins prononcé. En revanche, en Chine, ces élasticités sont toujours plutôt fortes, avec un envol en 2009.

Dans l’Union Européenne et aux États-Unis, la période entre 2004 et 2009 c’est précisément l’envol du nombre des demandes de brevet pour les turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical. Visiblement, l’envol simultané de la consommation des renouvelables était encore plus fort. Durant cette période 2004 – 2009, quelque chose de spécial est arrivé au marché d’énergies renouvelables en général. Quant à la Chine, la direction positive de la corrélation n’est pas sorcière : elle avait été pompée par trois facteurs simultanés, donc la croissance démographique, croissance en la consommation d’énergie par tête d’habitant et la croissance en nombre d’inventions. Encore, je reste sidéré par la forte signification de cette corrélation et je n’ai pas encore trouvé d’explication satisfaisante.

Je continue à vous fournir de la bonne science, presque neuve, juste un peu cabossée dans le processus de conception. Je vous rappelle que vous pouvez télécharger le business plan du projet BeFund(aussi accessible en version anglaise). Vous pouvez aussi télécharger mon livre intitulé “Capitalism and Political Power”. Je veux utiliser le financement participatif pour me donner une assise financière dans cet effort. Vous pouvez soutenir financièrement ma recherche, selon votre meilleur jugement, à travers mon compte PayPal. Vous pouvez aussi vous enregistrer comme mon patron sur mon compte Patreon. Si vous en faites ainsi, je vous serai reconnaissant pour m’indiquer deux trucs importants : quel genre de récompense attendez-vous en échange du patronage et quelles étapes souhaitiez-vous voir dans mon travail ?

 

Vous pouvez donner votre support financier à ce blog

€10,00

Time to come to the ad rem

This last update in French, namely Ma petite turbine éolienne à l’axe vertical, it stirred something interesting in my mind. As my internal happy bulldog is sniffing around that patent application no. EP 3 214 303 A1, questions take shape. How can this particular technology interact with its social environment?

How can any invention interact with its environment? Surprisingly enough, inventions behave very much akin to living organisms, in that respect: the main way they interact with their environment is breeding. Cross-breeding too, as I think of it. One invention seldom is a game changer. As soon as it starts multiplying, things start happening seriously. Let’s see, then, what’s up in the multiplying department. Any kind of multiplying results in a multiple, i.e. in a certain number of something. Mind you, if the incriminated multiplying goes on like really dynamically, it could be an uncertain number of something. Whatever. I am developing on that data you can already find in the Excel file you can see and download from the archive of my blog: I used https://patents.google.comonce again and I sifted out all those patent applications, which pertain to wind turbines with vertical axis, just as the one in that patent application no. EP 3 214 303 A1. I did for the same three big patent offices: the European Patent Office (EPO), the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and finally for the patent office of the People’s Republic of China (just ‘China’).

Table 1, below, shows the results of that little rummaging I did. This is one of those rare times when I am really puzzled by the numbers I find. You can notice that in all the three patent offices under scrutiny, patent applications pertaining to wind turbines with vertical axis make a very consistent percentage in the total stream of inventions filed for patenting under the general category of ‘wind turbine’. Especially with the EPO and the USPTO, that percentage is solid like a tax rate. With the Chinese patent office, it is a clement, descending tax rate.

 

Table 1 – Patent applications pertaining to wind turbines with vertical axis

Year Number of patent applications with EPO % share in the total of EPO’s  ‘wind turbine’ patent applications Number of patent applications with USPTO % share in the total of USPTO’s  ‘wind turbine’ patent applications Number of patent applications in China % share in the total of Chinese ‘wind turbine’ patent applications
[a] [b] [c] [d] [e] [f] [g]
2001 616 41,5% 1266 38,5% 369 29,1%
2002 599 37,8% 1294 38,3% 478 27,0%
2003 645 37,6% 1491 40,0% 645 27,0%
2004 806 40,7% 1703 40,7% 961 29,9%
2005 821 41,7% 1744 38,8% 1047 25,7%
2006 937 44,1% 1999 39,4% 1553 27,6%
2007 960 40,0% 2150 38,4% 1844 27,3%
2008 1224 44,5% 2454 39,4% 2342 26,7%
2009 1445 45,4% 2813 40,2% 2497 22,8%
2010 1746 46,6% 3482 42,4% 3298 24,8%
2011 2006 44,9% 3622 39,3% 4139 23,1%
2012 1886 42,1% 3699 39,0% 4551 20,6%
2013 1781 41,8% 3829 39,2% 5307 20,2%
2014 1800 38,8% 4074 40,4% 5740 18,1%
2015 1867 42,5% 4013 40,2% 7870 19,6%
2016 1089 39,8% 3388 40,6% 9325 20,4%
2017 349 42,9% 2115 42,7% 9321 22,3%

 I am definitely surprised with those results. Let’s rephrase it, to understand better the phenomenon hiding behind the numbers: whatever the actual number of patent application filed under the general category of ‘wind turbine’, those pertaining to wind turbines with vertical axis make around 40% in Europe and in the United States, whilst consistently descending from around 30% to some 20% in China. Here, we can see one of those phenomena that remain structurally stable no matter what is their actual size.

This is the moment when the teacher in me awakens and wants to do some lecturing about the foundations of the scientific method. In my previous updates, I gave you a glimpse of two distinct types of logic in interpreting numerical data: the frontier plot (At the frontier, with my numbers), and that of an indifference curve (Good hypotheses are simple). Now, I am going to use the occasion – namely that of explaining how a technology of wind turbine can interact with its social environment – to expose the fundamentals of studying time series.

The data in Table 1, above, shows, in general, how frequently people apply for patenting technologies connected to wind turbines with vertical axis. The ‘how frequently?’ further decomposes into ‘how many times in a unit of time?’, and ‘how many times out of a broader number?’, and these two shades of ‘how frequently?’ have different meanings. When I wonder (and measure) how many times a given thing is being done in a unit of time, it is like the social size of that thing. Big social things are those done a lot of times, like over one year, and small social things are performed much lesser a number of times.

Columns [b], [d], and [f] in Table 1express this approach to the social phenomenon labelled ‘invention in wind turbines with vertical axis’. They inform about the size of the phenomenon. In Europe, and in the United States, the size in question had been growing since 2001 until 2014, when it reached a temporary peak, which seems to have become sort of less protruding in 2016 and 2017. In China, the size of the thing named ‘invention in wind turbines with vertical axis’ has been changing differently: it is continuous growth since 2001 all the way through 2017.

Now, I pass to studying the ‘how many times out of a broader number?’ shade of ‘how frequently?’. Columns [c], [e], and [g] in Table 1 give me some insight in that respect. Those percentages are proportions, and thus they are measures of structure rather than size. Values in columns [c], [e] are remarkably recurrent, as if pegged down by some invisible hand. Those structures, in Europe and in the United States, are really stable. Whatever the size of the phenomenon labelled ‘invention in wind turbines with vertical axis’, its proportion to the broader phenomenon named ‘invention in wind turbines’remains fairly constant.

What does it mean? Imagine a human body. When it grows in size, do its internal proportions remain constant? Sometimes they do, but really just sometimes. When a child grows into an adult, many morphological proportions change, like the proportion ‘waist circumference to the length of the torso’. When an adult grows into more corpulent an adult (happens frequently), it changes, too. If a proportion is to remain stable over many different sizes, it has to be really, bloody fundamental.

You could raise a legitimate objection, here. After all, those numbers I quote in Table 1 come from semantic filtering at https://patents.google.com. There can be a cartload of semantic coincidences, for example an invention pertaining to wind turbines with horizontal axis might be mentioning the vertical axis of rotation. Windmills with horizontal axis can do that, i.e. turn on their vertical axis to catch the best wind. Already those Dutch oldies from the 17thcentury were able to perform that trick. It is possible that some of the patent applications accounted for in Table 1 contain this semantic bias. Still, it would be a remarkably consistent bias, occurring over and over again in the space of many years.

China presents a different picture. As the size of the phenomenon labelled ‘invention in wind turbines with vertical axis’, its proportion to the broader phenomenon named ‘invention in wind turbines’shrinks. This particular structure changes as the size of the phenomenon changes. Still, the change is far from random: it follows a relatively smooth, downwards path.

We have a first approach of how this particular technology – wind turbines with vertical axis – can work with its social environment. It can stay in some sort of homeostasis with other, similar technologies, or it can sort of slowly retreat to the benefit of those other, similar ones. Let’s go one step further and connect it to the share of renewable energy in the overall, final consumption of energy, as published by the World Bank. In Table 2, below, you can find the data pertaining to our three markets under scrutiny.

Table 2

  Share of renewable energy in the total consumption of energy
Year European Union United States China
2001 7,9% 4,7% 28,5%
2002 7,9% 4,8% 27,1%
2003 8,2% 5,3% 23,9%
2004 8,4% 5,5% 20,2%
2005 8,8% 5,8% 18,2%
2006 9,4% 6,4% 17,1%
2007 10,3% 6,3% 15,3%
2008 11,0% 6,8% 14,6%
2009 12,2% 7,4% 13,9%
2010 13,0% 7,5% 12,9%
2011 13,3% 8,2% 11,7%
2012 14,5% 8,5% 12,0%
2013 15,3% 8,7% 11,8%
2014 16,2% 8,8% 12,2%
2015 16,6% 8,7% 12,4%

OK, now I have two sets of variables: one about those inventions pertaining to wind turbines with vertical axis, and another one about the share of renewables in the overall energy consumption. Both are presented in the form of time series. What I can do with them both is to check for their mutual correlation. Among the many possible coefficients of correlation, I go for a classic: the Pearson correlation coefficient. I start checking that correlation in pairs of time series, for each geographical region separately. Table 3, below, presents the results, which are a bit puzzling. Before discussing them, let me introduce to the little presentational trick I am doing. In that table, I ascribed symbols to lines – [A] and [B] – and to columns, as consecutive roman numbers from [I] to [III]. It is just for the sake of convenience. In order not to repeat, each time, that long name ‘correlation between … and …’, I can just say ‘correlation [I][A]’ and everybody knows I am talking about the coefficient in the left upper case of the matrix etc. So, armed with that little editorial subterfuge, I develop my interpretation further below, underneath Table 3.

 

Table 3 – Matrix of Pearson correlation coefficients between the incidence of patent applications pertaining to wind turbines with vertical axis, and the share of renewable energy in the total consumption of energy

    Share of renewable energy in the total consumption of energy
  European Union United States China
    [I] [II] [III]
Number of patent applications pertaining to wind turbine with vertical axis [A] 0,945423082 0,986363487 -0,776361916
% share in the total of ‘wind turbine’ patent applications [B] 0,288279238 0,321381613 0,722853177

 I start with correlations [I][A] and [II][A]. They are high, and, I you want my opinion, they are surprisingly high. I didn’t expect such high values. They mean that the respective pairs of variables determine each other’s variance like around 90%, and this is very nearly a perfect congruence. It is as if each kilowatt hour of renewable energy literally dragged an invention about wind turbines with vertical axis out of the void of wannabe ideas, and vice versa.

Now, correlations [III][A], [I][B], and [II][B] do not really make me gasp for air. Looking at the numbers being correlated, these coefficients come as sort of logical. On the other hand, the last one, the [III][B] once again surprises me with its high positive value.

Good, time to come to the ad rem, as one of my professors in the law studies used to say. I asked a question: how can this particular technology, namely those vertical wind rotors, interact with its social environment? My first conclusion is that it interacts differently, depending on where it is actually interacting. In Europe and in the United States it interacts in a really strange, extremely patterned manner, as if each invention pertaining to those vertical Aeolian rotors had strings attached to it, and as if those strings had their other extremity anchored in a different invention in the wind energy, and to a kilowatt hour of renewables. Once again, believe, such strong, stable, structural patterns happen really seldom, particularly between so different phenomena. It looks almost like a Cartesian mechanism, with cogwheels moving each other. In China, that interaction is different, sort of less rigid and less determinist. There is some play in the game, over there.

All that little research about wind turbines with vertical axis turns weird. This is another of those empirical observations, which look extremely interesting, whilst I wish I could phrase out what they mean. I can cautiously formulate a working hypothesis, that the technologies of wind turbines make systems of different coherence according to the geographical region of the world, and that in some regions, those systems can be extremely determinist. Still, as scientific standards come, this is more a sketch of a hypothesis, rather than truly rigorous stuff.

I am consistently delivering good, almost new science to my readers, and love doing it, and I am working on crowdfunding this activity of mine. As we talk business plans, I remind you that you can download, from the library of my blog, the business plan I prepared for my semi-scientific project Befund  (and you can access the French versionas well). You can also get a free e-copy of my book ‘Capitalism and Political Power’ You can support my research by donating directly, any amount you consider appropriate, to my PayPal account. You can also consider going to my Patreon pageand become my patron. If you decide so, I will be grateful for suggesting me two things that Patreon suggests me to suggest you. Firstly, what kind of reward would you expect in exchange of supporting me? Secondly, what kind of phases would you like to see in the development of my research, and of the corresponding educational tools?

 

Support this blog

€10,00

Ma petite turbine éolienne à l’axe vertical

Voilà qu’arrive ce qui a dû arriver. Lorsque je me plonge dans les faits, je ne le fais jamais impunément. Une fois que je prends du goût dans l’observation de réalité telle qu’elle est, ça devient presque une obsession. Ainsi donc, dans mes deux mises à jour précédentes, j’avais tourné autour de cette hypothèse que « Les technologies d’exploitation des sources renouvelables d’énergie sont dans leur phase de banalisation, avec une adaptation de plus en plus poussée et réciproque entre lesdites technologies et les structures sociales qui les absorbent » (consultez Ça me démange, carrémentainsi que Good hypotheses are simple) Eh ben, ça m’a accroché. J’ai voulu voir d’un peu plus près ce que ça pourrait bien vouloir dire dans la vie réelle. J’ai donc pioché un peu dans les demandes de brevet, déposées à l’Office Européen des Brevets, et j’ai déniché cette invention intéressante – une turbine éolienne en forme d’une chaîne d’ADN, soumise par un groupe d’inventeurs Slovaques : Marcela Morvová, Vladimír Chudoba, Lubomír Stano, Andera Zilková et Michal Amena. Si vous cliquez sur ce long lien hypertexte, vous verrez par vous-mêmes : une petite merveille.

Ladite petite merveille appartient à la famille des turbines à l’axe vertical. C’est une technologie relativement jeunotte. Le gros de l’énergétique éolienne est basé sur les turbines à l’axe horizontal, qui, à leur tour, sont des versions plus ou moins Tech du bon vieux moulin à vent Hollandais : une p***in de grosse hélice, à grand rendement, positionnée à la verticale. Remarquez : dans les axes horizontaux, il y a du changement aussi. Il y a une famille des turbines qui marchent comme l’hélice d’un bateau, à une échelle beaucoup plus petite. Les turbines commercialisées par Semtiveen sont un bon exemple.

La turbine dont je parle maintenant, en revanche, demande de brevet no. EP 3 214 303 A1, c’est du relativement petit. La surface opérationnelle dont elle a besoin est d’à peine 5 m; on peut la monter dans un rectangle de 2,24 mètres de côté. Le truc qui intrigue, au sujet de ces turbines éoliennes à l’axe vertical est qu’il est très difficile de déterminer à coup sur leur capacité énergétique. Vous pouvez trouver une bonne revue de littérature à ce sujet chez Bhutta et al.(2012[1]) et une description tout aussi intéressante d’une expérience empirique dans le tunnel aérodynamique chez Howell et al.(2010[2]) et moi, je vais faire de mon mieux pour vous expliquer les trucs de base.

Alors la base, elle est faite de la formule suivante : PW = ½ * Cp* p * A * v3. « PW » c’est la capacité énergétique en question (juste l’histoire de montrer la parenté avec l’anglais ‘power’), « v » c’est la vitesse du vent, « A » représente la superficie totale du rotor (hélice), « p » symbolise la densité de l’air (p = 1.225kg/m3), et enfin « Cp » est le coefficient de capacité, ou, si vous voulez, d’efficacité énergétique. Cette équation est par ailleurs un bon prétexte pour faire un peu prof, de ma part, et de montrer la distinction entre les facteurs exogènes et endogènes d’une technologie. Ici, les facteurs exogènes, c’est la vitesse du vent et la densité de l’air. Cette dernière est constante, donc en terme des forces externes on a « ½ * p * v3 = 0,6125* v3».

Dans ma belle ville de Krakow (Pologne) la vitesse du vent aujourd’hui est d’à peu près 20 km/h = 20 * 0,277777778 m/s = 5,55555556 m/set c’est une brise agréable. Élevée à la puissance trois et multipliée par 0,6125, cette brise donne une capacité exogène de 105,0240057 kW. Ça, c’est ce que la mère Nature nous donne. Ma petite turbine peut faire un usage plus ou moins efficace de ce don, suivant la surface totale Ade l’hélice et l’efficacité énergétique Cp. Cette dernière peut varier, selon Bhutta et al.(2012[3]) entre 59% et 72%, quoi que ça change énormément suivant la technologie exacte. Même des trucs bêtes, comme la rugosité du matériel dont est faite l’hélice, jouent un rôle différent suivant la vitesse du vent. D’autre part, vu la vague montante d’innovation dans le domaine (consultez Ça me démange, carrément) j’assume que ça progresse, ces derniers temps. Je vais être conservatif et prendre une efficacité moyenne entre 59% et 72%, soit Cp= 65,5%. Le prototype de cette turbine no. EP 3 214 303 A1offre une superficie active de l’hélice égale à A = 1,334 m2et ça me donne, de tout en tout, PW = 1,334 *65,5% * 105,0240057 = 91,76682549 kW.

Ça a l’air prometteur. Suivant les données sur la consommation d’énergie, moi, comme Polonais moyen statistique, j’ai besoin de 0,56 kW, en moyenne, à mon usage personnel, pour mener la vie que je mène. Si je ne me suis pas gouré dans les calculs, avec une brise agréable de 20 kilomètres – heure, ce machin génère une capacité suffisante pour plus de 180 Polonais moyens statistiques comme moi. Je vérifie la probabilité d’avoir une brise comme ça sur toute l’année et là, je vois le premier problème. La vitesse du vent à laquelle cette turbine commence à produire de l’énergie utile est de v = 1,9 m/set c’est la vitesse moyenne du vent à Krakow sur les 12 derniers mois. Les jours de vent au-delà de v = 1,9 m/sc’est surtout le printemps et l’été ou, en d’autres termes, ma turbine aurait une chance quelconque de produire de l’énergie durant à peu de choses près la moitié de l’année. Sur le mois dernier, la vitesse moyenne était de v = 2,36 m/s et ça donne PW = 1,334 *65,5% * 0,6125 * 2,363= 7,034597146 kW, soit entre 13 et 14 Polonais statistiques moyens.

C’est moins optimiste mais plus réaliste, en même temps. Lorsque je traduis ces nombres en des faits de la vie quotidienne, j’ai la vision d’une petite communauté locale qui durant la saison venteuse de l’année peut satisfaire sa demande ménagère d’énergie avec un système des turbines éoliennes de taille tout aussi ménagère.

Ma ville, Krakow, ce n’est pas vraiment la capitale du vent. L’endroit est un réseau des vallées post-glaciales tortueuses, avec juste quelques plaines un peu plus spacieuses et l’ironie du sort veut que ces plaines soient placées surtout dans des endroits à risque élevé d’inondation. En revanche, toute la Pologne centrale et septentrionale, ça change énormément. La côte de la Baltique, par exemple, c’est une vitesse moyenne du vent égale à v = 12,9 m/set ça donne PW = 1,334 *65,5% * 0,6125 * 12,93= 1148,873874 kW.Plus d’un mégawatt, suffisant pour plus de deux milles Polonais statistiques moyens. Eh ben, dites donc, placée au bon endroit, cette petite turbine éolienne est un vrai ouragan !

Bon, je crois que je la vois venir, cette absorption de technologie. Avec la vague montante d’innovation, cela veut dire une impulsion puissante de développement pour les régions les plus favorisées en termes de conditions naturelles. Les régions côtières et les grandes plaines sont naturellement favorisées en ce qui concerne l’éolien. La banalisation des technologies d’énergétique renouvelable peut provoquer un changement profond de la géographie d’habitat humain. Des endroits typiquement ruraux en Europe peuvent soudainement devenir attrayants pour créer des villes.

Je continue à vous fournir de la bonne science, presque neuve, juste un peu cabossée dans le processus de conception. Je vous rappelle que vous pouvez télécharger le business plan du projet BeFund(aussi accessible en version anglaise). Vous pouvez aussi télécharger mon livre intitulé “Capitalism and Political Power”. Je veux utiliser le financement participatif pour me donner une assise financière dans cet effort. Vous pouvez soutenir financièrement ma recherche, selon votre meilleur jugement, à travers mon compte PayPal. Vous pouvez aussi vous enregistrer comme mon patron sur mon compte Patreon. Si vous en faites ainsi, je vous serai reconnaissant pour m’indiquer deux trucs importants : quel genre de récompense attendez-vous en échange du patronage et quelles étapes souhaitiez-vous voir dans mon travail ?

[1]Muhammad Mahmood Aslam Bhutta, Nasir Hayat, Ahmed Uzair Farooq, Zain Ali, Sh. Rehan Jamil, Zahid Hussain (2012) Vertical axis wind turbine – A review of various configurations and design techniques, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16 (2012) 1926–1939

[2]Howell, R., Qin, N., Edwards, J., Durrani, N. (2010) Wind tunnel and numerical study of a small vertical axis wind turbine, Renewable Energy, 35 (2), pp. 412- 422

[3]Muhammad Mahmood Aslam Bhutta, Nasir Hayat, Ahmed Uzair Farooq, Zain Ali, Sh. Rehan Jamil, Zahid Hussain (2012) Vertical axis wind turbine – A review of various configurations and design techniques, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 16 (2012) 1926–1939

Good hypotheses are simple

The thing about doing science is that when you really do it, you do it even when you don’t know you do it. Thinking about reality in truly scientific terms means that you tune yourself on discovery, and when you do that, man, you have released that ginn from the bottle (lamp, ring etc.). When you start discovering, and you get the hang of it, you realize that it is fun and liberating for its own sake. To me, doing science is like playing music: I am just having fun with it.

Having fun with science is important. I had a particularly vivid realization of that yesterday, when, due to a chain of circumstances, I had to hold a lecture in macroeconomics in a classroom of anatomy. There was no whiteboard to write on, but there were two skeletons standing in the two corners on my sides, and there were microscopes, of course covered with protective plastic bags. Have you ever tried to teach macroeconomics using a skeleton, and with nothing to write on? As I think about it, a skeleton is excellent for metaphorical a representation of functional connections in a system.

Since the beginning of this calendar year, I have been taking on those serious business plans, and, by the way, I am still doing it. Still, in my current work on two business plans I am preparing in parallel – one for the EneFinproject (FinTech in the market of energy), and the other one for the MedUsproject (Blockchain in the market of private healthcare) – I recently realized that I am starting to think science. In my last update in French, the one entitled Ça me démange, carrément, I have already nailed down one hypothesis, and some empirical data to check it. The hypothesis goes like: ‘The technology of renewable energies is its phase of banalisation, i.e. it is increasingly adapting its utilitarian forms to the social structures that are supposed to absorb it, and, reciprocally, those structures adapt to those utilitarian forms so as to absorb them efficiently’.

As hypotheses come, this one is still pretty green, i.e. not ripe yet for rigorous scientific proof, on the account of there being too many different ideas in it. Good hypotheses are simple, so as you can give them a shave with the Ockham’s razor and cut bullshit out. Still, a green hypothesis is better than no hypothesis at all. I can farm it and make it ripe, which I have already applied myself to do. In an Excel file you can see and download from the archive of my blog, I included the results of quick empirical research I did with the help of https://patents.google.com: I studied patent applications and patents granted, in the respective fields of wind, hydro, photovoltaic, and solar-thermal energies, in three important patent offices across the world, namely the European Patent Office (‘EP’ in that Excel file), the US Patent & Trademark office (‘US’), and in continental China.

As I had a look at those numbers, yes, indeed, there has been like a recent surge in the diversity of patented technologies. My intuition about banalisation could be true. Technologies pertaining to the generation of renewable energies start to wrap themselves around social structures around them, and said structures do the same with technologies. Historically, it is a known phenomenon. The motor power of animals (oxen, horses and mules, mostly), wind power, water power, thermal energy from the burning of fossil fuels – all these forms of energy started as novelties, and then grew into human social structures. As I think about it, even the power of human muscles went through that process. At some point in time, human beings discovered that their bodies can perform organized work, i.e. muscular power can be organized into labour.

Discovering that we can work together was really a bit of a discovery. You have probably read or heard about Gobekli Tepe, that huge megalithic enclosure located in Turkey, and being, apparently, the oldest proof of temple-sized human architecture. I watched an excellent documentary about the place, on National Geographic. Its point was that, if we put aside all the fantasies about aliens and Atlantians, the huge megalithic structure of Gobekli Tepe had been most probably made by simple, humble hunters-gatherers, who were thus discovering the immense power of organized work, and even invented a religion in order to make the whole business run smoothly. Nothing fancy: they used to cut their deceased ones’ heads off, would clean the skulls and keep them at home, in a prominent place, in order to think themselves into the phenomenon of inter-generational heritage. This is exactly what my great compatriot, Alfred Count Korzybski, wrote about being human: we have that unique capacity to ‘bind time’, or, in other words, to make our history into a heritage with accumulation of skills.

That was precisely the example of what a banalised technology (not to confuse with ‘banal technology’) can do. My point – and my gut feeling – is that we are, right now, precisely at this Gobekli-Tepe-phase with renewable energies. With the progressing diversity in the corresponding technologies, we are transforming our society so as it can work the most efficiently possible with said technologies.

Good, that’s the first piece of science I have come up with as regards renewable technologies. Another piece is connected to what I introduced, about the market of renewable energies in Europe, in my last update in English, namely in At the frontier, with my numbers. In Europe, we are a bit of a bunch of originals, in comparison to the rest of the world. Said rest of the world generally pumps up their consumption of energy per capita, as measured in them kilograms of oil equivalent. We, in Europe, we have mostly chosen the path of frugality, and our kilograms of oil per capita tend to shrink consistently. On the top of all that, there seems to be pattern in all that: a functional connection between the overall consumption of energy per capita and the aggregate consumption of renewable energies.

I am going to expose this particular gut feeling of mine by small steps. I Table 1, below, I am introducing two growth rates, compound between 1990 and 2015: the growth rate in the overall, final consumption of energy per capita, against that in the final consumption of renewable energies. I say ‘against’, as in the graph below the table I make a visualisation of those numbers, and it shows an intriguing regularity. The plot of points take the form opposite to those frontiers I showed you in At the frontier, with my numbers. This time, my points follow something like a gentle slope, and the further to the right, the gentler that slope becomes. It is visualised even more clearly with the exponential trend line (red dotted line).

We, I mean economists, call this type of curve, with a nice convexity, an ‘indifference curve’. Funnily enough, we use indifference curves to study choice. Anyway, there is sort of an intuitive difference between frontiers, on the one hand, and indifference curves, on the other hand. In economics, we assume that frontiers are somehow unstable: they represent a state of things that is doomed to change. A frontier envelops something that either swells or shrinks. On the other hand, an indifference curve suggests an equilibrium, i.e. each point on that curve is somehow steady and respectable as long as nobody comes to knock it out of balance. Whilst a frontier is like a skin, enveloping the body, an indifference curve is more like a spinal cord.

We have an indifference curve, hence a hypothetical equilibrium, between the dynamics of the overall consumption of energy per capita, and those of aggregate use of renewable energies. I don’t even know how to call it. That’s the thing with freshly observed equilibriums: they look nice, you could just fall in love with them, but if somebody asks what exactly are they, those nice things, you could have trouble to answer. As I am trying to sort it out, I start with assuming that the overall consumption of energy per capita reflects two complex sets. The first set is that of everything we do, divided into three basic fields of activity: a) the goods and services we consume (they contain energy that served to supply them) b) transport and c) the strictly spoken household use of energy. The second set, or another way of apprehending essentially the same ensemble of phenomena, is a set of technologies. Our overall consumption of energy depends on the total installed power of engines and electronic devices we use.

Now, the total consumption of renewable energies depends on the aggregate capacity installed in renewable technologies. In other words, this mysterious equilibrium of mine (in there is any, mind you) would be an equilibrium between two sets of technologies: those generating energy, and those serving to consume it. Honestly, I don’t even know how to phrase it into a decent hypothesis. I need time to wrap my mind around it.

Table 1

Growth rate in the overall, final consumption of energy per capita, 1990 – 2015 Growth rate in the final consumption of renewable energies, 1990 – 2015
Austria 17,4% 80,7%
Switzerland -18,4% 48,6%
Czech Republic -19,5% 241,0%
Germany -13,7% 501,2%
Spain 11,0% 104,4%
Estonia -33,0% 359,5%
Finland 4,1% 101,8%
France -3,7% 42,3%
United Kingdom -23,2% 1069,6%
Netherlands -3,7% 434,9%
Norway 17,1% 39,8%
Poland -8,0% 336,8%
Portugal 26,8% 32,6%

Growth rates energy per capita vs total renewable

 

I am consistently delivering good, almost new science to my readers, and love doing it, and I am working on crowdfunding this activity of mine. As we talk business plans, I remind you that you can download, from the library of my blog, the business plan I prepared for my semi-scientific project Befund  (and you can access the French versionas well). You can also get a free e-copy of my book ‘Capitalism and Political Power’ You can support my research by donating directly, any amount you consider appropriate, to my PayPal account. You can also consider going to my Patreon pageand become my patron. If you decide so, I will be grateful for suggesting me two things that Patreon suggests me to suggest you. Firstly, what kind of reward would you expect in exchange of supporting me? Secondly, what kind of phases would you like to see in the development of my research, and of the corresponding educational tools?

Ça me démange, carrément

Ces derniers jours, je me suis rendu compte qu’à part ce blog et ces business plans dont la préparation je documente ici, il faut que j’écrive quelque chose de scientifique. Il faut que je pose une hypothèse de nature générale et une méthode de recherche pour la vérifier. Je passe donc en revue les différentes idées qui sont venues dans ma tête durant les 6 – 8 derniers mois. J’ai beaucoup travaillé sur des business plans, donc logiquement le développement scientifique correspondant devrait s’en tenir plutôt à la microéconomie et/ou à la gestion. Vu la direction courante de ces business plans que je prépare, le marché de l’énergie – en combinaison avec les solutions FinTech – semble être le champ empirique privilégié pour cette science que je suis censé présenter.

J’avais découvert, il y a déjà quelque temps, que je suis plutôt empiriste que rationaliste dans ma méthode scientifique. Je regarde autour de moi, je renifle, je tâtonne s’il le faut, et je me fais une idée de ce que j’observe. Petit à petit, je peaufine cette idée jusqu’à ce qu’elle devienne une hypothèse. Une fois ma petite hypothèse en place, je retourne vers la réalité empirique, seulement cette fois de manière plus respectable : je catégorise et je mesure. J’essaie de voir des régularités quantifiables et je reformule mon hypothèse par référence à ces régularités. J’essaie de voir si je peux avancer une hypothèse intelligible que je puisse ensuite accompagner d’une preuve empirique.

Je réassume les observations empiriques que j’ai faites durant ces derniers mois, surtout en ce qui concerne les énergies renouvelables et le FinTech. Tout d’abord, je peux observer comme une vague technologique de miniaturisation dans le secteur des énergies renouvelables. Les moulins à vent, les turbines hydrauliques, même les centrales électriques solaires à chaleur solaire concentrée : tout ce bazar se rétrécit en termes de la taille des formes utilitaires. L’énergétique renouvelable est en train de se démocratiser en termes de taille et de s’adapter à une géographie dispersée. En parallèle à la miniaturisation, une maximisation a lieu, aussi paradoxal que ça puisse paraître. Je suis régulièrement les nouveautés technologiques dans le domaine des énergies renouvelables, par exemple avec https://www.techinsider.com, et je peux remarquer une vague des projets de taille gargantuesque. Dans l’éolien, par exemple, en parallèle au lancement des turbines de taille d’une machine à laver il y a ces turbines géantes que les Ecossais installent en mer.

Lorsqu’une technologie commence à prendre des formes utilitaires de plus en plus variées, cela veut dire son adaptation à la structure sociale, en d’autres mots sa banalisation. C’est une phase cruciale de changement technologique, car l’adaptation devient réciproque : à mesure que la technologie donnée prend des formes de mieux en mieux adaptées aux contextes locaux spécifiques, lesdits contextes changent de forme pour absorber cette technologie de plus en plus vite et avec de plus en plus d’aise. Alors voilà une jolie hypothèse : « Les technologies d’exploitation des sources renouvelables d’énergie sont dans leur phase de banalisation, avec une adaptation de plus en plus poussée et réciproque entre lesdites technologies et les structures sociales qui les absorbent ».

L’hypothèse, elle a beau être jolie, mais ce qu’il me faut c’est ce qu’elle soit empiriquement vérifiable. Sans cet attribut de preuve empirique possible, une hypothèse reste spéculative et selon Milton Friedman, les hypothèses spéculatives, y en a tout un tas et on ne sait pas vraiment quoi en faire. Il se fait que j’ai de l’expérience dans l’étude quantitative des brevets ainsi que des demandes de brevet. Une demande de brevet témoigne qu’un certain effort de recherche et développement avait été mis dans une invention qui, à son tour, est suffisamment originale pour être reconnue comme une nouveauté et pour avoir des chances de devenir une invention brevetée. Le nombre des demandes de brevet en un endroit et temps donné, ainsi que dans un champ spécifique de recherche et développement reflète l’effort relatif.

En revanche, un brevet assigné à une invention témoigne d’une originalité ainsi que d’une priorité temporelle suffisante pour que l’invention donnée reçoive la protection légale en des termes de propriété intellectuelle. Le nombre de brevets octroyés en un endroit et temps donné, dans un champ spécifique de recherche, est une mesure de la quantité des technologies nouvelles et originales à être mises en utilisation.

J’ai bénéficié des bienfaits de ce moteur de recherche de Google – https://patents.google.com– pour se faire une idée empirique de ce processus de banalisation des technologies. J’avais pioché aussi bien les demandes de brevets que les brevets eux-mêmes dans quatre domaines technologiques des énergies renouvelables : l’éolien, l’hydraulique, le photovoltaïque et enfin l’énergie solaire concentrée. Je rappelle que cette dernière c’est le truc des gros miroirs paraboliques qui absorbent la chaleur du soleil et la transforment en chaleur industrielle (vapeur), qui, à son tour, travaille ensuite normalement comme dans une centrale électrique thermique, en propulsant une turbine électrique.

Je me suis concentré sur trois offices des brevets importants dans le monde : l’Office Européen des Brevets (OEB), The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) aux États-Unis, et l’office des brevets de la République Populaire Chinoise (OBC). Voilà le lien hypertexte au fichier Excel avec les résultats de cette excursion empirique. Je sais que certains systèmes, sur des ordinateurs personnels, ont des préjugés en ce qui concerne les fichiers Excel et peuvent bloquer leur affichage ou téléchargement. Pour ceux parmi vous, mes chers lecteurs, dont les systèmes personnels témoignent de cette aversion particulière, je reproduis les tableaux de ce fichier plus loin, en-dessous du texte.

Voilà donc que je peux confronter mon hypothèse avec des faits quantifiables. Je fais une assomption additionnelle : si une banalisation des technologies d’énergétique renouvelable est effectivement en train de survenir, elle est liée à un effort d’innovation. Si une nouvelle variété de turbine hydraulique, par exemple, est prête à être commercialisée, elle va se démarquer, par des détails significatifs, des technologies précédentes. Toutes les innovations dans le domaine ne seront pas forcément soumises aux procédures de brevet, néanmoins un changement substantiel dans le nombre d’inventions qui y sont soumises est une mesure dudit effort d’innovation. La banalisation d’un domaine donné de technologie devrait donc être associée à un nombre accru d’inventions brevetées.

Dans l’éolien, un tel changement est visible et – ce qui est intéressant – il est visible plus au niveau des brevets octroyés qu’au niveau des demandes nouvelles de brevet. On peut voir comme une vague technologique qui continue à monter. C’est tout comme si, ces dernières années, un certain nombre des procédures de brevet ait passé dans la phase de « secouer les rênes » et de mise en exploitation accélérée. Je profite déjà de cette première observation pour attirer votre attention à une différence intéressante entre l’Europe et les États-Unis d’une part et la Chine d’autre part. En Europe et aux États-Unis il y a normalement plus de demandes de brevet que des brevets octroyés : la procédure de brevetage fonctionne comme un tri. Les inventions soumises à la procédure sont sélectionnées et certaines de parmi elles sont éliminées ou bien s’enlisent dans des longs procès légaux en ce qui concerne leur priorité.

En Chine, vous pouvez observer l’inverse : normalement il y plus des brevets octroyés que des demandes déposées. Honnêtement, j’ai un savoir des plus superficiels sur le fonctionnement du système légal chinois et dans ce que je vais avancer je m’appuie sur des cas occasionnels que j’avais étudiés. Apparemment, en Chine, une demande de brevet conduit fréquemment au sciage de l’invention soumise à ladite demande en tout un ensemble des brevets différents. Fréquemment, c’est même une stratégie délibérée de la part d’entités qui sollicitent la protection légale de leurs inventions.

Dans le photovoltaïque, nous pouvons observer quelque chose de similaire à l’éolien : une vague montante des brevets, quoi que dans ce cas, cette vague semble avoir reculé un peu en 2017. Par contre, dans le solaire concentré, je vois une vague d’innovation qui continue à gagner en hauteur. C’est par ailleurs bien ce que je pressentais dans mes os depuis un certain temps : le photovoltaïque s’est un peu essoufflé en termes de changement technologique, pendant que le solaire concentré ne fait que commencer à valser.

Comme je jette un coup d’œil sur l’hydroélectricitéje vois quelque chose de similaire, donc une vague montante de brevets octroyés, mais je vois aussi une autre disparité géographique. L’Europe est systématiquement en recul derrière les États-Unis et la Chine en termes d’intensité de changement technologique dans tous les quatre domaines étudiés ici, mais en termes d’hydroélectricité, ce n’est plus du recul : c’est carrément une capitulation. Ça me révolte quoi que ça ne m’étonne que moyennement. Ça me révolte parce que l’énergie hydraulique, côte à côte avec l’éolien, c’est pratiquement ce qui eût bâti la civilisation européenne entre le 11èmeet le 19èmesiècle. Nous avons, sur ce petit continent montagneux, un réseau fluvial des plus favorables et ça avait été aussi un facteur puissant de succès développemental de la civilisation européenne. Voir tout ce potentiel tellement inexploité en termes d’énergie, ça me démange, carrément.

Tout en étant révolté, je ne suis que moyennement étonné. J’ai déjà rencontré plusieurs opinions critiques quant au développement de l’hydroélectrique en Europe. D’une part, l’exploitation des rivières, au moins pour l’exploitation des turbines hydrauliques, semble être définitivement sur-régulée. Où que nous posions le pied, au bord d’une rivière, il y a des terrains exclus d’exploitation pour des raisons environnementales. J’adore les canards sauvages, mais je déteste cette espèce d’êtres humains sauvages qui excluent d’avance tout compromis entre un gîte des canards et une turbine hydraulique locale.

En plus, le secteur d’énergie en Europe est extrêmement concentré. En dépit de toute la libéralisation de ces trois dernières décennies, nous vivons toujours dans un oligopole poussé et les oligopoles, ça ne favorise pas la banalisation des technologies.

Bon, fini de penser science, pour aujourd’hui. Je continue à vous fournir de la bonne science, presque neuve, juste un peu cabossée dans le processus de conception. Je vous rappelle que vous pouvez télécharger le business plan du projet BeFund(aussi accessible en version anglaise). Vous pouvez aussi télécharger mon livre intitulé “Capitalism and Political Power”. Je veux utiliser le financement participatif pour me donner une assise financière dans cet effort. Vous pouvez soutenir financièrement ma recherche, selon votre meilleur jugement, à travers mon compte PayPal. Vous pouvez aussi vous enregistrer comme mon patron sur mon compte Patreon. Si vous en faites ainsi, je vous serai reconnaissant pour m’indiquer deux trucs importants : quel genre de récompense attendez-vous en échange du patronage et quelles étapes souhaitiez-vous voir dans mon travail ?

Tableau 1 – Brevets octroyés et demandes de brevets dans les technologies éoliennes

Année OEB brevets octroyés OEB demandes de brevet déposées USPTO brevets octroyés USPTO demandes de brevet déposées Chine OBC brevets octroyés Chine OBC demandes de brevet déposées
2001 374 1486 2191 3285 2235 1267
2002 550 1585 2323 3381 2386 1768
2003 758 1716 2324 3731 2720 2392
2004 763 1980 2342 4189 3300 3218
2005 722 1969 2138 4499 3673 4076
2006 901 2126 2497 5071 4824 5623
2007 804 2399 2509 5606 6696 6744
2008 857 2749 2481 6229 8640 8787
2009 764 3182 2660 6992 11478 10937
2010 1008 3749 3648 8220 15652 13295
2011 1192 4464 4398 9225 20661 17906
2012 1391 4479 5389 9488 27254 22090
2013 1666 4260 6051 9774 33328 26225
2014 1659 4643 7194 10078 35338 31693
2015 2099 4395 7375 9993 48821 40055
2016 3048 2734 7813 8355 56485 45724
2017 3273 814 8988 4957 62516 41857

 

Tableau 2 – Brevets octroyés et demandes de brevets dans les technologies hydroélectriques

Année OEB brevets octroyés OEB demandes de brevet déposées USPTO brevets octroyés USPTO demandes de brevet déposées Chine OBC brevets octroyés Chine OBC demandes de brevet déposées
2001 21 73 91 161 249 172
2002 19 72 81 159 259 191
2003 38 81 102 221 331 295
2004 35 122 111 224 344 363
2005 21 110 107 254 411 446
2006 40 125 108 333 462 614
2007 20 150 106 451 735 751
2008 41 221 146 569 966 1041
2009 29 241 127 707 1269 1314
2010 55 331 243 652 1836 1437
2011 48 377 327 774 2396 1948
2012 69 394 348 618 2977 2589
2013 86 365 421 643 3541 3001
2014 85 343 521 592 3727 3246
2015 144 349 498 465 5656 4057
2016 197 186 482 304 5890 4870
2017 207 69 603 2 6229 4280

 

Tableau 3 – Brevets octroyés et demandes de brevets dans les technologies photovoltaïques

Année OEB brevets octroyés OEB demandes de brevet déposées USPTO brevets octroyés USPTO demandes de brevet déposées Chine OBC brevets octroyés Chine OBC demandes de brevet déposées
2001 541 2214 3000 4704 1099 1280
2002 752 2263 3062 4972 1413 1770
2003 1010 2469 3219 5489 1831 2540
2004 1015 2834 3256 6421 2149 3177
2005 892 3427 2973 7086 2519 4099
2006 1137 3936 3554 8314 3139 5499
2007 988 4359 3496 9144 4661 7424
2008 1111 5063 3620 10342 6347 9235
2009 1043 6022 4089 12082 9001 12890
2010 1365 6856 5882 14541 13550 17161
2011 1587 7135 6804 16800 20681 21771
2012 1836 6872 8637 16624 28039 26413
2013 2073 6889 10158 17512 34288 29462
2014 2159 6679 12287 17278 30017 30250
2015 2440 6853 12824 16809 43855 35899
2016 3884 3775 13444 14005 53246 40760
2017 4242 859 14973 8815 55365 35507

 

Tableau 4 – Brevets octroyés et demandes de brevets dans la technologie solaire concentrée

Année OEB brevets octroyés OEB demandes de brevet déposées USPTO brevets octroyés USPTO demandes de brevet déposées Chine OBC brevets octroyés Chine OBC demandes de brevet déposées
2001 116 559 702 1154 69 293
2002 168 622 767 1191 115 389
2003 223 639 761 1409 183 544
2004 240 722 679 1613 298 694
2005 191 876 672 1893 324 1003
2006 254 1084 756 2209 396 1308
2007 224 1222 761 2548 621 1629
2008 252 1576 728 3055 791 2262
2009 269 1849 881 3670 1149 3316
2010 344 2153 1412 4367 1762 4460
2011 409 2143 1758 5103 2651 5540
2012 476 2092 2241 5017 3640 6177
2013 533 1925 2726 5142 4155 6323
2014 638 1843 3375 5055 4208 6348
2015 693 1815 3610 4896 6102 7741
2016 1080 958 3682 3699 7557 7771
2017 1218 152 3929 2400 7723 5862

At the frontier, with my numbers

And so I am working on two business concepts in parallel. One of them is EneFin, my own idea of a FinTech utility in the market of energy, with a special focus on promoting the development of new, local providers in renewable energies. The other is MedUs, a concept I am developing together with a former student of mine, and this one consists in creating an online platform for managing healthcare services, as well as patients’ medical records, in the out-of-pocket market of medical services.

The basic concept of EneFinis to combine trade in futures contracts on retail supply of electricity, with trade in participatory deeds in the providers of said electricity. My sort of idée fixeis to create a FinTech utility that allows, in turn, creating local networks of energy production and distribution as cooperative structures, where the end-users of energy are, in the same time, shareholders in the local power installations. I want to use FinTech tools in order to extract all the advantages of a cooperative structure (low barriers to entry for new projects and investors, low prices of energy) with those of a typically capitalist one (high liquidity and adaptability).

After a cursory review of the available options in terms of legal and financial schemes (see Traps and loopholesas well as Les séquences, ça me pousse à poser cette sorte des questions), I came up with two provisional conclusions. Firstly, a crypto-currency, internal to EneFin looks like the best way of organising smooth trade in both the futures contracts on energy and the participatory shares in the energy providers. Secondly, the whole business has better chances to survive and thrive if the essential concept of EneFin is being offered to users as a set of specific options in an otherwise much broader trading platform.

EneFin as a business in itself can make profits on trading fees strictly spoken, like a percentage on every transaction, still, if the underlying technological platform develops really well, EneFin could grow an engineering branch, supplying that technology in itself to other organizations. This is an option to take into account in any business with ‘tech’ in its description.

MedUs, on the other hand, is based on the idea that the strictly spoken medical services, I mean the out-of-pocket paid ones, tend to be quite chaotic, at least in the context of European markets. In Europe, most healthcare is being financed via public pooled funds, accompanied by private pooled funds (or via network structures that operate de facto as pooled funds). The out-of-pocket paid healthcare is frequently an emergency or a luxury, usually not the bulk of medical care we use. Medical records generated in the out-of-pocket healthcare are technically there (each doctor has to create a file for a patient, even for one visit), and yet they have sort of a nebular structure: it is bloody hell of a nightmare to recreate your personal, medical history out of these.

The basic concept of MedUs consists in using Blockchain technology in order to create a dynamic ledger medical records. Blockchain acts as an archive in itself, very resilient to unlawful modifications. If my otherwise a bit accidental, dispersed medical visits, paid in the out-of-pocket system, are being arranged and paid via a Blockchain-based platform, it is possible to attach a ledger of medical records to the strictly spoken ledger of transactions. I say ‘possible’ because in that nascent business we still don’t have a clear idea of technological feasibility: Blockchain is cool in simple semantic structures, like cryptocurrencies, but becomes really consuming, in terms of energy and disk-space, if we want to handle large, complex sets of data.

MedUs, as we see it now, is supposed to earn money in three essential ways: a) through trading visit-coupons for private healthcare (i.e. coupons that serve to pay for medical care), in the form of coupons strictly spoken or of a cryptocurrency b) through running a closed platform accessible to medical providers after they pay for the initial software package and a monthly, participatory fee, and c) as a provider of the technology of creating local structures in (a) and (b). I can also see a possible carryover from the EneFin concept to MedUs: new, local providers of healthcare could sell their participatory shares to patients together with those visit-coupons, and thus create cooperative structures in local markets.

In this update I am focusing on one specific issue regarding both concepts, namely on the basic, quantitative market research, which I understand as the study of prices and quantities. My point is that you have two fundamental strategies of developing a new business. Your business can grow as your market grows, for one. That’s the classical approach, to find, for example, with Adam Smith. Still, there are businesses which flourish in slowly dying markets. The market of oil is a good example: there is no prospects for big growth, this is certain, and yet there are companies that still make profits in oil.

In a few past updates, I took something like a cursory set of 13 European countries and I calculated their various, quantitative attributes regarding EneFinand the European market of energy. These countries are: Austria, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Germany, Spain, Estonia, Finland, France, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal. I am going to keep my focus on this set of countries and run a comparative market research, in terms of basic prices and quantities, for both concepts (i.e. EneFin and MedUS) together.

Now, I will try to move forward along that narrow crest that separates educational content from strictly spoken market research for business purposes. I want this blog to be educational, so I am going to give some methodological explanations as I run my quantitative analysis, and yet, in the same time, I want material, analytical progress for both business plans. Thus, here we go.

Both concepts address a similar relation suppliers and their customers. Households are the target customers in both cases. As for EneFin, the category of ‘households’ is a bit more flexible: it can encompass small businesses, small local NGOs, and farms as well. Still, in both of those business concepts populationis the most fundamental metric for measuring quantities. I usually reach to the demographics published by the World Bank: this source is quick to dig info out of it (I mean the interface is handy), and, as far as I know, it is reliable. I am a big fan of using demographics in market research, by the way: they can tell us much more than it superficially appears.

Demographic data from the World Bank covers the window since 1960 through 2016. Quantitative market research is about dynamics in time, as well as about cross-sectional differences. Here below, in Table 1, there is a bit of demographic info about my 13 countries:

Table 1 – Demographic analysis

Country Population headcount in 2016 Demographic growth since 1960 through 2016
Austria 8 747 358 24,1%
Switzerland 8 372 098 57,1%
Czech Republic 10 561 633 10,0%
Germany 82 667 685 13,5%
Spain 46 443 959 52,5%
Estonia 1 316 481 8,7%
Finland 5 495 096 24,1%
France 66 896 109 42,9%
United Kingdom 65 637 239 25,3%
Netherlands 17 018 408 48,2%
Norway 5 232 929 46,1%
Poland 37 948 016 28,0%
Portugal 10 324 611 16,6%
Total 366 661 622 29,3%

Good, now what do those demographics tell? In am interested in growth rates in the first place. Anyone who knows at least a little about the demographics of Europe can intuitively grasp the difference between, let’s say, the headcount of Switzerland as compared to that of Germany. On the other hand, growth rates are less intuitive. I start from the bottom line, i.e. from that compound rate of demographic growth in all the 13 countries taken together. It is 29,3% since 1960 through 2016, which makes a CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) equal to CAGR = 29,9% / (2016 – 1959) = 0,51%. Nothing to write home about, really. The whole sample of 13 countries makes quite a placid demographic environment. Yet, the overall placidity is subject to strong cross-sectional disparities. Some countries, like Switzerland, or Spain, display strong demographic growth, whilst others are like really placid in that respect, e.g. Germany.

How does it matter? Good question. If each consecutive generation has a bigger headcount than the preceding one, in each such consecutive generations new social roles are likely to form. The faster the headcount grows, the more pronounced is that aspect of social change. On the other hand, we are talking about populations that grow (or not really) in constant territories. More people in a constant space means greater a density of population, which, in turn, means more social interactions and more learning in one unit of time. Summing up, the rate of demographic growth is one of those (rare) quantitative indicators that reflect true structural change.

Now, we can go a bit wild in our thinking and do something I call ‘social physics’. An elephant running at 10 km per hour represents greater a kinetic energy than a dog running at the same speed. Size matters, and speed matters. The size of the population, combined with its growth rate, makes something like a social force. Below, I am presenting a graph, which, I hope, expresses this line of thinking. In that graph, you can see a structure, where a core of 5 countries (Austria, Finland, Estonia, Czech Republic, and Portugal) sort of huddles against the origin of the manifold, whilst another set of countries sort of maxes out along some kind of frontier, enveloping the edges of the distribution. These max-outs are France and Spain, in the first place, followed by Switzerland and Netherlands on the side of growth, as well as by Germany and UK on the side of numerical size.

Some social phenomena behave like that, i.e. like a subset of frontier cases, clearly differentiating themselves from the subset of core cases. Usually, the best business is to be made at the frontier. Mind you, the entities of such a frontier analysis do not need to be countries: they can be products, business concepts, regions, segments of customers. Whatever differs by absolute size and its rate of change can be observed like that.

Demogr13_1 

My little demographic analysis shows me that whichever of the two projects I think about – EneFin or MedUs – sheer demographics make some countries (the frontier cases) in my set of 13 clearly better markets than others. After demographics, I turn towards metrics pertinent to energy in general, renewable energies, and to the out-of-pocket market in healthcare. I am going to apply consistently that frontier-of-size-versus-growth-rate approach you could see at work in the case of demographic data. Let’s see where it leads me.

As for energy, I start with a classic, namely the final consumption of energy per capita, as published by the World Bank. This metric is given in kg of oil equivalent per person per year. You want to convert it into kilowatt hours, like in electricity? Just multiply it by 11,63. Anyway, I take a pinch of that metric, just enough for those 13 countries, and I multiply it by another one, i.e. by the percentage share of renewable energies in that final consumption, also from the website of the World Bank. I stir both of these with the already measured population, and I have like: final consumption of energy per capita * share of renewable energies * population headcount = total final consumption of renewable energies [tons of oil equivalent per year].

Table 2, below, summarizes the results of that little arithmetical rummaging. Is there another frontier? Hell, yes. Germany and United Kingdom are the clear frontier cases. Looks like whatever anyone would like to do with renewable energies, in that set of 13 countries, Germany and UK are THE markets to go.

Table 2 – National markets of renewable energies

Country Final consumption of renewable energies in 2015, tons of oil equivalent Final consumption of renewable energies, compound growth rate 1990 – 2015
Austria 11 296 981,38 80,7%
Switzerland 6 200 709,18 48,6%
Czech Republic 6 036 384,16 241,0%
Germany 44 301 158,29 501,2%
Spain 19 412 734,75 104,4%
Estonia 1 508 374,57 359,5%
Finland 14 036 145,55 101,8%
France 33 167 337,48 42,3%
United Kingdom 15 682 329,72 1069,6%
Netherlands 4 223 183,03 434,9%
Norway 17 433 243,73 39,8%
Poland 11 267 553,99 336,8%
Portugal 5 996 364,89 32,6%

 Good, time to turn my focus to the other project: MedUs. I take a metric available with the World Health Organization, namely ‘Out-of-Pocket Expenditure (OOPS) per Capita in PPP Int$ constant 2010’.  Before I introduce the data, a bit of my beloved lecturing about what it means. So, ‘PPP’ stands for purchasing power parity. You take a standard basket of goods that most people buy, in the amounts they buy it per year, and you measure the value of that basket, in local currencies of each country, at local prices. You take the coefficient of national income per capita in the given country, and you divide it by the monetary value of that basket. It tells you how many such baskets can your average caput(Latin singular from the plural ‘capita’) purchase for an average chunk of national income. That ratio, or purchasing power, makes two ‘Ps’ out of the three. Now, you take the PP of United States as PP = 1,00 and you measure the PP of each other country against the US one. This is how you get the parity of PPs, or PPP.

PPP is handy for converting monetary aggregates from different countries into a common denominator made of US dollars. When we compare national markets, PPP dollars are better than those calculated with the exchange rates, as the former very largely get rid of local inflation, as well as local idiosyncrasies in pricing. With those international dollars being constant for 2010, inflation is basically kicked out of the model. The final point is that measuring national markets in PPP dollars is almost like measuring quantities, sort of standard units of medical services in this case.

So, I take the OOPS and I multiply it by the headcount of the national population, and I get the aggregate OOPS, for all the national capita taken together, in millions of PPP dollars, constant 2010. You can see the results in Table 3, below, once again approached in terms of the latest size on record (2015 in this case) vs. the compound growth rate (2000 – 2015 for this specific metric, as it is available with WHO). Once again, is there a frontier? Yes, it is made of: United Kingdom, Germany and Spain, followed respectfully by Netherlands, Switzerland and Poland. The others are the core.

Question: how can I identify a frontier without making a graph? Answer: you can once again refer to that concept of social physics. You take the size of the market in each country, or its aggregate OOPS. You compute the share of this national OOPS in the total OOPS of all the 13 countries taken together. This is the relative weight of that country in the sample. Next, you multiply the compound growth rate of the national OOPS by its relative weight and you get the metric in the third numerical column, namely ‘Size-weighted growth rate’. The greater value you obtain in that one, the further from the centre of the manifold, the two variables combined, you would find the given country.

Table 3 – Aggregate Out-Of-Pocket Expenditure on Healthcare

Country Aggregate OOPS in millions of PPP dollars in 2015 Compound growth rate in the aggregate OOPS, 2000 -2015 Size-weighted growth rate
Austria 7 951 105,8% 3,8%
Switzerland 17 802 124,9% 9,9%
Czech Republic 3 862 300,2% 5,2%
Germany 54 822 104,9% 25,7%
Spain 35 816 146,9% 23,5%
Estonia 565 308,6% 0,8%
Finland 4 356 98,5% 1,9%
France 20 569 84,7% 7,8%
United Kingdom 39 935 275,5% 49,1%
Netherlands 11 027 227,7% 11,2%
Norway 4 607 100,3% 2,1%
Poland 15 049 124,1% 8,3%
Portugal 7 622 86,8% 3,0%

 Time to wrap up the writing and serious thinking for today. You had an example of quantitative market analysis, in the form of ‘frontier vs. core’ method. When we talk about the relative attractiveness of different markets, that method, i.e. looking  for frontier markets, is quite logical and straightforward.

I am consistently delivering good, almost new science to my readers, and love doing it, and I am working on crowdfunding this activity of mine. As we talk business plans, I remind you that you can download, from the library of my blog, the business plan I prepared for my semi-scientific project Befund  (and you can access the French versionas well). You can also get a free e-copy of my book ‘Capitalism and Political Power’ You can support my research by donating directly, any amount you consider appropriate, to my PayPal account. You can also consider going to my Patreon pageand become my patron. If you decide so, I will be grateful for suggesting me two things that Patreon suggests me to suggest you. Firstly, what kind of reward would you expect in exchange of supporting me? Secondly, what kind of phases would you like to see in the development of my research, and of the corresponding educational tools?

Les gains associés

 

Mon éditorial via You Tube

J’ai décidé d’utiliser mon blog pour documenter mon travail entier de recherche et pas uniquement la préparation du business plan pour le projet EneFin. Ça fait trois projets au total ; à part le concept d’entreprise vous connaissez déjà, donc EneFin, je suis en train de préparer un autre business plan, pour un concept de startup développé par mon ancien étudiant dans le marché des services médicaux ; le troisième truc c’est un livre sur le secteur FinTech. Vous trouverez une description de ces trois directions de travail dans ma dernière mise à jour en anglais : Crossbreeds, once they survive the crossbreeding process.

En ce qui concerne le projet EneFin et le marché d’énergie, je suis en train de revoir mes sources d’information. Je me suis intéressé à deux articles quelque peu couverts de poussière – puisqu’ils datent de 1999 : Transmission Rights and Market Power on Electric Power Networks I: Financial Rightspar Paul Joskow et Jean Tirole suivi par Transmission Rights and Market Power on Electric Power Networks II: Physical Rightsdes mêmes auteurs. La raison pour laquelle je veux les étudier à fond est le fait qu’ils reflètent un aspect important du marché de l’énergie : les mécanismes que je propose dans le cadre du concept EneFinpour le marché de détail marchent depuis longtemps dans le marché de gros. Ledit marché de gros fonctionne, de façon routinière, comme tout autre marché, à un rythme réglé part des équilibres locaux entre l’offre et la demande, avec l’utilisation de toute une gamme des produits financiers et en présence d’une forte régulation légale. Les contrats long-terme s’y entremêlent avec des transactions ponctuelles du type spot. Par comparaison, les contrats long-terme que nous, les particuliers, signons avec nos fournisseurs directs d’électricité ont l’air, en fait, une relique dont la seule raison de demeurer toujours en place semble être une vague appréhension vis à vis de ce qui pourrait se passer si on s’en passait.

Je commence donc par une courte introduction en la matière desdits « transmission rights » ou « droits de transmission ». Je commence par une évidence : personne ne peut signer ses électrons. Une centrale électrique charge dans le réseau de transmission 10 MWh et ces 10 mégawatt heures ont un prix de gros. Quelqu’un doit payer ce prix, avec une marge de détail, à la fin de la chaîne de distribution. Ce quelqu’un c’est nous, les consommateurs finaux, qui, de notre côté, n’avons aucun moyen de savoir d’où est-ce qu’ils viennent exactement, ces électrons que nous mettons dans le compresseur de notre frigo ou bien dans le moteur de notre machine à laver. A la rigueur, avec beaucoup de mesurage dans le réseau, il est possible de calculer la probabilité que la kilowatt heure donnée que je suis en train d’utiliser vient d’une centrale électrique donnée, mais ce calcul ressemble largement à de la physique quantique : ce qu’on a c’est seulement une probabilité.

Tout réseau de distribution d’électricité est donc comme un réservoir doté d’un système des valves à l’entrée et à la sortie. Une centrale électrique peut identifier la valve à travers laquelle son énergie entre dans le système (le nœud ou le site de chargement) et – dans une certaine mesure – elle peut identifier la valve de sortie (nœud/site de consommation) et cette identification est possible grâce au système des contrats et d’instruments financiers. « Dans une certaine mesure » veut dire que l’identité exacte du consommateur final est dans le domaine de décision du distributeur local d’énergie, qui est en charge du réseau local de moyenne et de basse tension. Un nœud de consommation d’énergie est donc le point exact dans le réseau de distribution ou l’électricité distribuée en haute tension est transformée en moyenne ou basse tension et « transmise » au distributeur local. Un nœud de consommation est aussi un point de facturation.

Là-dessous, vous pouvez voir une présentation graphique de la structure du réseau de transmission d’énergie, qui, à son tour, fait l’ossature du marché. Plus loin en-dessous vous trouverez l’équation de revenu gagné par une centrale électrique comme fournisseur primaire d’électricité.

La structure du réseau

 La structure du réseau

 

L’équation de revenu de la centrale électrique

 Revenu de la centrale electrique

Dans ce cadre général, différents points de facturation peuvent enregistrer des prix substantiellement différents. L’échelle de cette disparité dépend du pays et, dans une grande mesure, de l’heure de facturation. Le marché d’électricité s’étend sur 8760 heures dans l’année (8784 si c’est une bissextile) et chacune d’elles peut s’associer avec un prix différent.  Un fournisseur primaire d’électricité (une centrale électrique) peut acheter des contrats à terme (instruments financiers dérivés) qui sont déjà pré-facturés à un prix défini pour un nœud de consommation précis et une heure précise. C’est comme si ce fournisseur primaire s’achetait une facturation en avance. Ces contrats à terme sont précisément appelés « droits de transmission », puisqu’ils simulent, sur le plan légal et financier, une situation où un fournisseur primaire d’énergie acquiert une garantie que son énergie sera vendue et facturée comme si elle était consommée à un nœud précis du réseau et à un moment précis.

Les deux articles que je suis en train de passer en revue – Transmission Rights and Market Power on Electric Power Networks I: Financial Rightset Transmission Rights and Market Power on Electric Power Networks II: Physical Rights– signés Paul Joskow et Jean Tirole développent une théorie de fonctionnement du marché d’électricité dans le contexte des droits de transmission. A l’époque quand ces deux articles étaient écrits, en 1999, les droits de transmission étaient parmi les rares instruments financiers typiquement « spot » (c’est à dire correspondants aux transactions ponctuelles sans appui direct dans des contrats long-terme) appliqués dans le marché de gros en électricité. Étudier le fonctionnement des droits de transmission était un excellent prétexte pour étudier la libéralisation du marché d’énergie au sens large.

Je me suis intéressé à ces deux articles pour deux raisons : auteurs et conclusions. Quant aux auteurs, le nom de Paul Joskow en ce qui concerne le marché d’énergie est un peu comme celui de Paul Krugman dans la géographie économique. Même si je décidais de le contourner, ce serait à mes propres risques et périls. Quant à Jean Tirole, je respecte profondément son acquis scientifique et ce prix Nobel en économie qu’il avait reçu en 2014 était vraiment bien justifié. La conclusion générale de la part de ces deux auteurs est pratiquement à l’opposé de ce que moi je soutiens au sujet de mon concept EneFin. Pendant que moi, je prétends que l’introduction d’un système basé sur les contrats à terme, dans le marché de détail en énergie, peut favoriser le développement des petits fournisseurs locaux et des petites installations locales basées sur les énergies renouvelables, Paul Joskow et Jean Tirole disent quelque chose de diamétralement opposé : les contrats à terme qui parient sur les prix futurs, ça favorise les gros joueurs et fait du mal au pouvoir d’achat des petits consommateurs.

Oui, je sais, je pourrais les ignorer en prétendant que dans le marché de l’énergie, avec tous les changements observés, 1999 c’était à peine après l’invention de la roue et les thèses de l’époque ne tiennent plus débout. Seulement, je sais par expérience qu’ignorer délibérément un point de vue particulier provoque à faire de même pour un autre point de vue particulier, et ces points de vue particuliers et délibérément ignorés ont tendance à s’accumuler. Il y a un point critique dans cette accumulation du savoir passé sous silence, où l’ignorance ciblée et délibérée se transforme en une ignorance générale et involontaire.

Je veux donc bien comprendre le point de vue de Paul Joskow et Jean Tirole, juste l’histoire de ne pas être con. Alors, leur réflexion est présentée en deux étapes : d’abord ils étudient le fonctionnement des droits de transmission tels qu’ils sont, donc comme instruments purement financiers, et ensuite ils font une extrapolation théorique où ces instruments financiers créent des droits physiques d’exploitation vis à vis le réseau de distribution d’énergie. Comme c’est mon habitude, je me concentre le plus sur les assomptions fondamentales du modèle théorique de Joskow – Tirole, et aussitôt je découvre les racines de leurs thèses au propos qui m’intéresse.

Joskow et Tirole assument, très pertinemment si vous voulez mon avis, que les contrats à terme dans le marché d’énergie émergent comme quelque chose de financièrement utile lorsqu’il y a des imperfections économiques marquées dans la distribution géographique de génération primaire d’électricité. Par « imperfections économiques » je comprends quelque chose de très simple : certaines régions accueillent des surplus notables d’énergie produite par rapport à l’énergie consommée pendant que d’autres ont des déficits. Logiquement, les prix les plus intéressants, qui valent la peine d’être garantis par des contrats à terme tels que les droits de transmission, sont ceux pratiqués dans les régions à déficit, où la demande est beaucoup plus élevée que l’offre. Si je suis in fournisseur primaire d’énergie et si je sais qu’il y ait de tels marchés locaux, j’ai deux stratégies long-terme à leur égard : soit j’investis dans les droits de transmission pour exploiter les prix locaux anormalement élevés, soit j’investis dans la construction de capacité génératrice locale. Pratiquer les deux stratégies en parallèle serait illogique, puisque tout investissement en capacité génératrice locale va liquider une grande partie des bénéfices issus des droits de transmission.

Je pense que je comprends. Il y a des situations où la création d’instruments financiers peut aider le flux de capital vers des actifs productifs nouveaux mais il y en a d’autres quand c’est exactement le contraire qui se passe, c’est-à-dire les titres financiers servent à concentrer et immobiliser le capital disponible plutôt qu’à son flux vers des projets nouveaux. La concentration survient lorsque les gains possibles à obtenir de la détention simple des titres financiers sont plus grand que ceux associés avec l’utilisation de ces mêmes ou autres titres pour financer des projets nouveaux.

Je vois donc deux types de contexte pour l’application de la fonctionnalité EneFin, telle que je la vois à présent, assez souple et généraliste (consultez Les séquences, ça me pousse à poser cette sorte des questions). Le contexte à haute mobilité de capital physique est celui où la construction de nouvelle capacité génératrice locale est relativement facile, point de vue technologique et légal (permis de construction et d’exploitation, par exemple). Dans un tel contexte le gain marginal issu du changement technologique réel (nouveaux moulins à vent, nouvelles turbines hydrauliques etc.) a des fortes chances de surpasser celui de la détention des titres financiers en tant que tels. En revanche, lorsque la création des nouvelles installations rencontre des obstacles substantiels – par exemple lorsqu’il est extrêmement difficile d’obtenir un permis d’exploitation pour une turbine hydraulique nouvelle – la mobilité du capital physique décroît significativement et ça peut payer plus d’exploiter de déficits en l’offre d’énergie que de les combler avec de la capacité locale nouvelle.

Bon, je pense que j’ai temporairement pompé ma cervelle à sec. Il me faut la remettre à plein.

Je continue à vous fournir de la bonne science, presque neuve, juste un peu cabossée dans le processus de conception. Je vous rappelle que vous pouvez télécharger le business plan du projet BeFund(aussi accessible en version anglaise). Vous pouvez aussi télécharger mon livre intitulé “Capitalism and Political Power”. Je veux utiliser le financement participatif pour me donner une assise financière dans cet effort. Vous pouvez soutenir financièrement ma recherche, selon votre meilleur jugement, à travers mon compte PayPal. Vous pouvez aussi vous enregistrer comme mon patron sur mon compte Patreon. Si vous en faites ainsi, je vous serai reconnaissant pour m’indiquer deux trucs importants : quel genre de récompense attendez-vous en échange du patronage et quelles étapes souhaitiez-vous voir dans mon travail ?