I re-run my executable script

I am thinking (again) about the phenomenon of collective intelligence, this time in terms of behavioural reinforcement that we give to each other, and the role that cities and intelligent digital clouds can play in delivering such reinforcement. As it is usually the case with science, there is a basic question to ask: ‘What’s the point of all the fuss with that nice theory of yours, Mr Wasniewski? Any good for anything?’.

Good question. My tentative answer is that studying human societies as collectively intelligent structures is a phenomenology, which allows some major methodological developments, which, I think, are missing from other methodologies in social sciences. First of all, it allows a completely clean slate at the starting point of research, as regards ethics and moral orientations, whilst it almost inevitably leads to defining ethical values through empirical research. This was my first big ‘Oh, f**k!’ with that method: I realized that ethical values can be reliably studied as objectively pursued outcomes at the collective level, and that study can be robustly backed with maths and empirics.

I have that thing with my science, and, as a matter of fact, with other people’s science too: I am an empiricist. I like prodding my assumptions and make them lose some fat, so as they become lighter. I like having as much of a clean slate at the starting point of my research as possible. I believe that one single assumption, namely that human social structures are collectively intelligent structures, almost automatically transforms all the other assumptions into hypotheses to investigate. Still, I need to go, very carefully, through that one single Mother Of All Assumptions, i.e. about us, humans as a society, being collectively intelligent a structure, in order to nail down, and possibly kick out any logical shortcut.

Intelligent structures learn by producing many alternative versions of themselves and testing those versions for fitness in coping with a vector of constraints. There are three claims hidden in this single claim: learning, production of different versions, and testing for fitness. Do human social structures learn, like at all? Well, we have that thing called culture, and culture changes. There is observable change in lifestyles, aesthetic tastes, fashions, institutions and technologies. This is learning. Cool. One down, two still standing.

Do human social structures produce many different versions of themselves? Here, we enter the subtleties of distinction between different versions of a structure, on the one hand, and different structures, on the other hand. A structure remains the same, and just makes different versions of itself, as long as it stays structurally coherent. When it loses structural coherence, it turns into a different structure. How can I know that a structure keeps its s**t together, i.e. it stays internally coherent? That’s a tough question, and I know by experience that in the presence of tough questions, it is essential to keep it simple. One of the simplest facts about any structure is that it is made of parts. As long as all the initial parts are still there, I can assume they hold together somehow. In other words, as long as whatever I observe about social reality can be represented as the same complex set, with the same components inside, I can assume this is one and the same structure just making copies of itself. Still, this question remains a tough one, especially that any intelligent structure should be smart enough to morph into another intelligent structure when the time is right.      

The time is right when the old structure is no longer able to cope with the vector of constraints, and so I arrive to the third component question: how can I know there is adaptation to constraints? How can I know there are constraints for assessing fitness? In a very broad sense, I can see constraints when I see error, and correction thereof, in someone’s behaviour. In other words, when I can see someone sort of making two steps forward and one step back, correcting their course etc., this is a sign of adaptation to constraints. Unconstrained change is linear or exponential, whilst constrained change always shows signs of bumping against some kind of wall. Here comes a caveat as regards using artificial neural networks as simulators of collective human intelligence: they are any good only when they have constraints, and, consequently, when they make errors. An artificial neural network is no good at simulating unconstrained change. When I explore the possibility of simulating collective human intelligence with artificial neural networks, it has marks of a pleonasm. I can use AI as simulator only when the simulation involves constrained adaptation.

F**k! I have gone philosophical in those paragraphs. I can feel a part of my mind gently disconnecting from real life, and this is time to do something in order to stay close to said real life. Here is a topic, which I can treat as teaching material for my students, and, in the same time, make those general concepts bounce a bit around, inside my head, just to see what happens. I make the following claim: ‘Markets are manifestations of collective intelligence in human societies’. In science, this is a working hypothesis. It is called ‘working’ because it is not proven yet, and thus it has to earn its own living, so to say. This is why it has to work.

I pass in review the same bullet points: learning, for one, production of many alternative versions in a structure as opposed to creating new structures, for two, and the presence of constraints as the third component. Do markets manifest collective learning? Ledzzeee… Markets display fashions and trends. Markets adapt to lifestyles, and vice versa. Markets are very largely connected to technological change and facilitate the occurrence thereof. Yes, they learn.

How can I say whether a market stays the same structure and just experiments with many alternative versions thereof, or, conversely, whether it turns into another structure? It is time to go back to the fundamental concepts of microeconomics, and assess (once more), what makes a market structure. A market structure is the mechanism of setting transactional prices. When I don’t know s**t about said mechanism, I just observe prices and I can see two alternative pictures. Picture one is that of very similar prices, sort of clustered in the same, narrow interval. This is a market with equilibrium price, which translates into a local market equilibrium. Picture two shows noticeably disparate prices in what I initially perceived as the same category of goods. There is no equilibrium price in that case, and speaking more broadly, there is no local equilibrium in that market.

Markets with local equilibriums are assumed to be perfectly competitive or very close thereto. They are supposed to serve for transacting in goods so similar that customers perceive them as identical, and technologies used for producing those goods don’t differ sufficiently to create any kind of competitive advantage (homogeneity of supply), for one. Markets with local equilibriums require the customers to be so similar to each other in their tastes and purchasing patterns that, on the whole, they can be assumed identical (homogeneity of demand), for two. Customers are supposed to be perfectly informed about all the deals available in the market (perfect information). Oh, yes, the last one: no barriers to entry or exit. A perfectly competitive market is supposed to offer virtually no minimum investment required for suppliers to enter the game, and no sunk costs in the case of exit.  

Here is that thing: many markets present the alignment of prices typical for a state of local equilibrium, and yet their institutional characteristics – such as technologies, the diversity of goods offered, capital requirements and whatnot – do not match the textbook description of a perfectly competitive market. In other words, many markets form local equilibriums, thus they display equilibrium prices, without having the required institutional characteristics for that, at least in theory. In still other words, they manifest the alignment of prices typical for one type of market structure, whilst all the other characteristics are typical for another type of market structure.

Therefore, the completely justified ‘What the hell…?’question arises. What is a market structure, at the end of the day? What is a structure, in general?

I go down another avenue now. Some time ago, I signalled on my blog that I am learning programming in Python, or, as I should rather say, I make one more attempt at nailing it down. Programming teaches me a lot about the basic logic of what I do, including that whole theory of collective intelligence. Anyway, I started to keep a programming log, and here below, I paste the current entry, from November 27th, 2020.

 Tasks to practice:

  1. reading well structured CSV,
  2. plotting
  3. saving and retrieving a Jupyter Notebook in JupyterLab

I am practicing with Penn World Tables 9.1. I take the version without empty cells, and I transform it into CSV.

I create a new notebook on JupyterLab. I name it ‘Practice November 27th 2020’.

  • Path: demo/Practice November 27th 2020.ipynb

I upload the CSV version of Penn Tables 9.1 with no empty cells.

Shareable link: https://hub.gke2.mybinder.org/user/jupyterlab-jupyterlab-demo-zbo0hr9b/lab/tree/demo/PWT%209_1%20no%20empty%20cells.csv

Path: demo/PWT 9_1 no empty cells.csv

Download path: https://hub.gke2.mybinder.org/user/jupyterlab-jupyterlab-demo-zbo0hr9b/files/demo/PWT%209_1%20no%20empty%20cells.csv?_xsrf=2%7C2ce78815%7C547592bc83c83fd951870ab01113e7eb%7C1605464585

I code libraries:

import numpy as np

import pandas as pd

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

import os

I check my directory:

>> os.getcwd()

result: ‘/home/jovyan/demo’

>> os.listdir()

result:

[‘jupyterlab.md’,

 ‘TCGA_Data’,

 ‘Lorenz.ipynb’,

 ‘lorenz.py’,

 ‘notebooks’,

 ‘data’,

 ‘jupyterlab-slides.pdf’,

 ‘markdown_python.md’,

 ‘big.csv’,

 ‘Practice November 27th 2020.ipynb’,

 ‘.ipynb_checkpoints’,

 ‘Untitled.ipynb’,

 ‘PWT 9_1 no empty cells.csv’]

>> PWT9_1=pd.DataFrame(pd.read_csv(‘PWT 9_1 no empty cells.csv’,header=0))

Result:

  File “<ipython-input-5-32375ff59964>”, line 1

    PWT9_1=pd.DataFrame(pd.read_csv(‘PWT 9_1 no empty cells.csv’,header=0))

                                       ^

SyntaxError: invalid character in identifier

>> I rename the file on Jupyter, into ‘PWT 9w1 no empty cells.csv’.

>> os.listdir()

Result:

[‘jupyterlab.md’,

 ‘TCGA_Data’,

 ‘Lorenz.ipynb’,

 ‘lorenz.py’,

 ‘notebooks’,

 ‘data’,

 ‘jupyterlab-slides.pdf’,

 ‘markdown_python.md’,

 ‘big.csv’,

 ‘Practice November 27th 2020.ipynb’,

 ‘.ipynb_checkpoints’,

 ‘Untitled.ipynb’,

 ‘PWT 9w1 no empty cells.csv’]

>> PWT9w1=pd.DataFrame(pd.read_csv(‘PWT 9w1 no empty cells.csv’,header=0))

Result: imported successfully

>> PWT9w1.describe()

Result: descriptive statistics

# I want to list columns (variables) in my file

>> PWT9w1.columns

Result:

Index([‘country’, ‘year’, ‘rgdpe’, ‘rgdpo’, ‘pop’, ’emp’, ’emp / pop’, ‘avh’,

       ‘hc’, ‘ccon’, ‘cda’, ‘cgdpe’, ‘cgdpo’, ‘cn’, ‘ck’, ‘ctfp’, ‘cwtfp’,

       ‘rgdpna’, ‘rconna’, ‘rdana’, ‘rnna’, ‘rkna’, ‘rtfpna’, ‘rwtfpna’,

       ‘labsh’, ‘irr’, ‘delta’, ‘xr’, ‘pl_con’, ‘pl_da’, ‘pl_gdpo’, ‘csh_c’,

       ‘csh_i’, ‘csh_g’, ‘csh_x’, ‘csh_m’, ‘csh_r’, ‘pl_c’, ‘pl_i’, ‘pl_g’,

       ‘pl_x’, ‘pl_m’, ‘pl_n’, ‘pl_k’],

      dtype=’object’)

>> PWT9w1.columns()

Result:

TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)

<ipython-input-11-38dfd3da71de> in <module>

—-> 1 PWT9w1.columns()

TypeError: ‘Index’ object is not callable

# I try plotting

>> plt.plot(df.index, df[‘rnna’])

Result:

I get a long list of rows like: ‘<matplotlib.lines.Line2D at 0x7fc59d899c10>’, and a plot which is visibly not OK (looks like a fan).

# I want to separate one column from PWT9w1 as a separate series, and then plot it. Maybe it is going to work.

>> RNNA=pd.DataFrame(PWT9w1[‘rnna’])

Result: apparently successful.

# I try to plot RNNA

>> RNNA.plot()

Result:

<matplotlib.axes._subplots.AxesSubplot at 0x7fc55e7b9e10> + a basic graph. Good.

# I try to extract a few single series from PWT9w1 and to plot them. Let’s go for AVH, PL_I and CWTFP.

>> AVH=pd.DataFrame(PWT9w1[‘avh’])

>> PL_I=pd.DataFrame(PWT9w1[‘pl_i’])

>> CWTFP=pd.DataFrame(PWT9w1[‘cwtfp’])

>> AVH.plot()

>> PL_I.plot()

>> CWTFP.plot()

Result:

It worked. I have basic plots.

# It is 8:20 a.m. I go to make myself a coffee. I will quit JupyterLab for a moment. I saved my today’s notebook on server, and I will see how I can open it. Just in case, I make a PDF copy, and a Python copy on my disk.

I cannot do saving into PDF. An error occurs. I will have to sort it out. I made an *.ipynb copy on my disk.

demo/Practice November 27th 2020.ipynb

# It is 8:40 a.m. I am logging back into JupyterLab. I am trying to open my today’s notebook from path. Does not seem to work. I am uploading my *.ipynb copy. This worked. I know now: I upload the *.ipynb script from my own location and then just double click on it. I needed to re-upload my CSV file ‘PWT 9w1 no empty cells.csv’.

# I check if my re-uploaded CSV file is fully accessible. I discover that I need to re-create the whole algorithm. In other words: when I upload on JupyterLab a *.ipynb script from my disk, I need to re-run all the operations. My first idea is to re-run each executable cell in the uploaded script. That worked. Question: how to automatise it? Probably by making a Python script all in one piece, uploading my CSV data source first, and then run the whole script.

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